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Jessica

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  • 10
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Loved it

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-11-17

One of my favourite books, read beautifully. I've always loved Jane Austen's novels, but I hadn't read any of them for a while. I'd almost forgotten just how funny they can be, and the humour comes across very well in audiobook form.

Terrible

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-04-17

What disappointed you about God's High Calling for Women?

This book is dire. Lots and lots about women should not do - no dressing like a prostitute at church, ladies, no going to church to find a man, no dressing like a prostitute at church, no authority, no dressing like a prostitute at church... about 25% of the book is spent on this.
So what is God's high calling for women, other than not wearing stripper shoes on a Sunday morning?Apparently God's high calling for women is 'the role of subordination and subjection'.

The arguments used by the author are so full of flaws and blatant, deliberate misreadings of Scripture that I find the book highly objectionable.The author claims that 'when Eve stepped out from under the protection of Adam, she was highly vulnerable and fell'. No. Eve was tempted by Satan and chose to disobey God. Genesis 3 makes it clear that conflict in the relationship between man and woman came as a result of the fall.

The argument that women should not prophesy in church begins with mentioning a Scriptural basis and then misinterpreting a whole lot of other Scripture. 'There were loads of women prophetesses in the Bible, but they don't count because they were women and women have never been prophetesses because only men get to do that!' It's not exactly the world's best argument. Why not just discuss the relevant passage in the NT and leave it at that? I'm not a fan of Scripture being twisted to support an argument. Not everything needs to backed up with sixty different irrelevant quotations. I think the author needs to remember the story about the man who decided that he would live his life by the first verse he set eyes on when opening his eyes to a random page, and opened the Bible to 'he went and hanged himself'.

I'm also not a fan of 'here is a passage from Paul's letter... Odd numbered verses should be considered in light of the cultural traditions of the day, but even numbered verses should be taken literally'. Although there are many parts of the Bible where an understanding of the culture of the day does shed light on the Scripture in question, choosing whether or not to consider this based on whether or not it fits your argument gets you nowhere.In summary, this book says almost nothing about God's high calling for women. It says a lot about what women shouldn't do (REMEMBER, NO PROSTITUTE DRESSES IN CHURCH) but pretty much nothing else (there is a very brief mention of the need for women to be well-educated in Scripture so that they can raise their children to know God's word, but this takes about a fifth of the time devoted to the no stripping in church thing).

TLDR: full of blatant misreadings of Scripture, and about as enlightening as a broken lightbulb. And remember: no dressing like a hooker in church.

Would you ever listen to anything by John MacArthur again?

No. I had expected better from a relatively well-known Christian writer, but I was very disappointed with his method of (mis)reading Scripture.

How could the performance have been better?

A little less smug male self-satisfaction would have been nice. It would have made the book a little more palatable.

You didn’t love this book--but did it have any redeeming qualities?

There were occasionally a few nuggets of wisdom hidden in the dungheap. Just not enough of them to make it worth spending two hours filtering dung with my ears.

Any additional comments?

I should make it clear that I'm not fundamentally opposed to some of what the author tries, and fails, to say. I actually agree that the New Testament teaches that women should not take on public preaching roles in church and that it is a blessing for a woman to be able to raise her children to know God and the Scriptures. I'm also pretty sure that church is not the place for dressing like a prostitute. I just have a really big problem with how MacArthur twists Scripture to the point where some of what he says (i.e. Eve fell because she disobeyed man, not because she disobeyed God) utterly contradicts the word of God.

3 people found this helpful

Doesn't work as an audiobook, but good content

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-04-17

The content of this audiobook is good, and taken individually there is a lot of useful food for thought in each of the individual sections, but I must admit I really struggled to get through this. I think I would have got a lot more from it in printed book format - because each section was only five(ish) minutes long, if I was distracted for a minute I'd missed a significant amount of the section.

A verg enjoyable listen

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-05-16

Excellent - really enjoyable and inspiring. One peeve - there is nothing more irritating than hearing someone refer to a toilet as a bathroom (in the interest of hygiene and general accuracy when referring to the public variety, let's just not). Unfortunately, a book about running is inevitably going to mention it at some point. Other than that, this book amused me during a couple of long trajn journeys and left me wanting to go out and run (like a girl).

Good overall, but wanders off-topic

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-04-16

Started off well, but lost its subject (fasting) and spent a chapter ranting about abortion. I happen to agree with the author on the topic, but if I want to listen to a rant about abortion I will do - I don't really want it inserted into a book on fasting via a tenuous link. 'All these people in the Bible fasted and their motives/methods/pride pleased/displeased God. Because God rewards those who do His will and are nice to others without getting up themselves about the whole business, we should fast and pray about serioua world problems. I am now going to talk about abortion, abortion law in America, American governmental ills and how the Supreme Court ia a failure of democracy for 45 minutes.'

Having said that, the other five hours were excellent. I would just recommend skipping the last chapter as it really doesn't relate to the topic of the book. With that in mind, I would still recommend it to anyone interested in Christian fasting and a Biblical argument for it.

Not my cup of tea

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-04-15

Would you try another book written by Neil Gaiman or narrated by Lenny Henry?

Yes - I'm a big fan of Neil Gaiman, as a rule, and I was quite happy with the narration.

Any additional comments?

I really couldn't get into Anansi Boys. I really don't enjoy stories or films where anyone is embarrassed, because it makes me cringe, and the first hour is all about how embarrassing Fat Charlie's dad was.
I didn't finish listening to this, but I wouldn't rule out ever going back and listening to the rest of it.

A wonderful book for anyone of any age

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-04-15

Where does The Graveyard Book rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Right up at the top, alongside Neverwhere (also a Gaiman), Heart of Darkness (Conrad) and Richard Armitage's reading of love poetry.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Graveyard Book?

The danse macabre!

Which character – as performed by Neil Gaiman – was your favourite?

Miss Lupescu.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

The final chapter where Bod was growing up made me want to cry into my tea - it was moving without being slushy and that made it all the more touching.

Any additional comments?

Listen to it! I avoided The Graveyard Book for a while, thinking that I wouldn't like it because it was written for children. Having read it, I'm very glad I changed my mind - it's a wonderful book. I think I read an interview with Gaiman once where he said that when he writes for children, he is particularly choosy about the words he uses, because as there are fewer words in children's novels he can't afford to be sloppy and use words that he just happens to like. You can really see that in The Graveyard Book, because the word and the sphrasing and the overall structure are just absolutely perfect.
On a slightly different note, I love that Bod's love of stories is reflected in the episodic structure of the novel - I can imagine the ghosts in the graveyard telling Bod's story in this way for centuries to come.

Still hilarious

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-04-15

Would you consider the audio edition of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy to be better than the print version?

No - they're equally fantastic in slightly different ways.

What other book might you compare The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy to, and why?

It defies comparison. But don't panic.

Any additional comments?

This is a good books for clearing out the seat next to you on the bus. There's nothing quite like the snort of laughter that escapes after Slartibartfast announces that he loves fjords because they give a lovely baroque feeling to a continent for getting rid of gum-chewing cowards who don't want to sit next to the local nutter.

2 people found this helpful

An excellent performance

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-03-15

What made the experience of listening to Neverwhere [Adaptation] the most enjoyable?

It's a fantastic story read by brilliant actors.

Which character – as performed by the narrators – was your favourite?

The Marquis de Carabas.

If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

Mind the Gap.

"Sorry. Wrong London"

Any additional comments?

It would have been nice for there to be some sort of division between the end of the story and the beginning of the best quotes/bloopers/etc - having already listened to the unabridged version, I got massively confused when it just seemed to continue on after the ending. It took a few sentences for me to realise that I was listening to an assortment of great quotes.

A fantastic fairy tale

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-03-15

Where does Stardust rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

High - fantasy is probably my favourite genre to listen to and this is my second favourite fantasy audiobook after Neverwhere.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Primus! He has a hearty, booming sort of charm, despite the whole murderous intentions thing.

What about Neil Gaiman’s performance did you like?

He's fantastic at performing a wide range of voices and doesn't sound as if he's taking the mickey out of all his female characters.

Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

I didn't have a particularly strong emotional reaction, but I really enjoyed listening to it and wanted to find out what happened at the end.

Any additional comments?

This book deserves five stars, but I listened to it straight after Neverwhere, which was absolutely brilliant.