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Last of The Summer Whine!

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-01-15

If this book wasn’t for you, who do you think might enjoy it more?

A predictable justification from a player who sets out to excuse his own behaviour whilst condemning all the others. Sad

What three words best describe Byron Mondahl’s performance?

Can't do it in three words - but his rendition of KP's sing-song and slightly effete saffer accent was very good to the extent that I found myself getting annoyed with him. Shame his material wasn't up to his performance.

3 people found this helpful

Nearly, but not quite 5 star

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-11-13

Any additional comments?

An excellent yarn mixing historical events with the fiction of the romance of the two main characters but spoiled for me by a lack of appreciation of the relationship between the amateur and professional cricketer in pre-WW1 England. William Maitalnd, the hero, is a public school educated man who decides to make cricket his "profession", and signs professional terms with a fictional county based on the old county ground at Hastings (The Priory). He is offered the captaincy of his county but declines on a matter of loyalty to a team mate who his committee want to sack. In reality, this would never have occurred at this time. It would be another 20 years before a professional captained a first class county (Ewart Astill) and it is unlikely Maitland would have been permitted to play as a professional in the first place. Even if he could not afford to play as an amateur, some means of defraying his expenses would have been found to avoid him becoming a traitor to his class - as was the case with many during the Victorian and Edwardian era - WG Grace to name but one.

The rest of the cricket related matters in the book are done well which makes it all the more surprising that the author should have missed this small, but significant point

This little irritation (and perhaps a frustration with Maitland's stuffed shirt reluctance to follow his heart) it is excellent.

1 person found this helpful

Wodehouse on Top Form

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-04-13

There is scarcely need to review the content of this book - it is, as it says on the cover, by PG Wodehouse and is, therefore, a work of considerable genius. It is a collection of nine short stories originally published in 1929. Each story relates a tale of one of the narrators extended family and is told in the bar of Mulliners' local pub. Despite the efforts of his fellow drinkers to prevent him doing so, Mulliner always manages to tell his tale.

Jonathan Cecil, the narrator, does a wonderful job in capturing the voices and brightness of the delivery that is essential for Wodehouse.

Thoroughly recommended.

4 people found this helpful

Trials and Tribulations of a Wanna Be!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-07-12

Essential reading for me as a cricket nut who writes a little. The narrative is a little like one of those dreams where you are wading through treacle whilst trying to run a 100m race. His efforts to obtain the coveted media passes were beset by such difficulties, that you could almost touch the frustration. A little dark in places when he becomes disillusioned with his attempts to join the ranks of cricket journalists but it is all handled with humour and a great deal of self-deprecation. I'm glad I listened

3 people found this helpful