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Jake Dalton

  • 6
  • reviews
  • 4
  • helpful votes
  • 48
  • ratings
  • The Innocent Man

  • By: John Grisham
  • Narrated by: Craig Wasson
  • Length: 12 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 134
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 118
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 117

John Grisham’s first work of nonfiction, an exploration of small town justice gone terribly awry, is his most extraordinary legal thriller yet.In the major league draft of 1971, the first player chosen from the State of Oklahoma was Ron Williamson. When he signed with the Oakland A’s, he said goodbye to his hometown of Ada and left to pursue his dreams of big league glory. Six years later he was back, his dreams broken by a bad arm and bad habits—drinking, drugs, and women.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • truly amazing story

  • By Patricia on 04-10-16

As close to perfect as you'll find.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-01-19

A truly brilliant, compelling, evocative listen. Highly absorbing and highly recommended. In my opinion, this is what true crime writing should be.

  • I'll Be Gone in the Dark

  • One Woman's Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer
  • By: Michelle McNamara
  • Narrated by: Gabra Zackman, Gillian Flynn - introduction, Patton Oswalt - afterword
  • Length: 9 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 253
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 231
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 230

For more than 10 years, a mysterious and violent predator committed 50 sexual assaults in Northern California before moving south, where he perpetrated 10 sadistic murders. Then he disappeared, eluding capture by multiple police forces and some of the best detectives in the area. Three decades later, Michelle McNamara, a true crime journalist who created the popular website True Crime Diary, was determined to find the violent psychopath she called the Golden State Killer. Michelle pored over police reports, interviewed victims, and embedded herself in the online communities that were as obsessed with the case as she was. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Dark, Compelling True Crime, But Material Missing!

  • By Simon on 26-11-18

Not quite what I wanted it to be.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-12-18

It's a shame that we'll never know exactly what this book was supposed to be. It's hard to be too critical of the story given that this is essentially a collection of articles and notes that have been stitched together. Though the writing style is not for me, what does come through is a clear sense of the author's passion for the case. In terms of narration, I find the use of accents to be pretty poor and frankly, unnecessary. I also find the choice to pronounce "E.A.R" as "ear" rather than the acronym E-A-R very strange, given that it is used in some pretty serious discussions. Hearing "Ear rape" repeatedly during sombre moments detracts from the mood of the book. Similarly, is it really necessary to qualify every name with "pseudonym" rather than simply stating that many names have been changed at the start? This is worth a listen, but given the hype it has received, it wasn't what I'd hoped for.

  • Cruel Deception

  • St. Martin's True Crime Library
  • By: Gregg Olsen
  • Narrated by: Christy Lynn
  • Length: 11 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 10
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 9
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 9

In and out of hospitals since birth, angelic nine-month-old Morgan Reid finally succumbed to what appeared to be Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Morgan's Texas-born mother Tanya, a nurse and devoted wife, pulled up stakes with her grieving husband Jim, and moved on. It was the best way to put the past behind them. Until their son Michael, a boy who by all accounts was terrified of his mother, began showing signs of the same affliction that stole the life of his baby sister....

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Bugs Bunny

  • By A.Connor on 16-06-17

Decent

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-04-17

Interest story, but some of the narration is really strange. The accents and sudden shouting is wholly unnecessary and for some reason the narrator pronounces Texas as "taxes". It does calm down a bit as it gets towards the end though.

  • Precious Victims

  • Penguin True Crime
  • By: Don W. Weber, Charles Bosworth Jr.
  • Narrated by: Kevin Pierce
  • Length: 15 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 84
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 78
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 78

The police in Jersey County, Illinois, accepted Paula Sims' story of a masked kidnapper who snatched her baby girl, Lorelei, from her bassinet. Three years later, her second newborn daughter suffered an identical fate - and this time the police were unable to stop searching until they had discovered the whole horrifying truth. This is the full terrifying story of twisted sexuality and hate seething below the surface of a seemingly normal family and of the massive investigation and nerve-shattering trial that made the unthinkable a reality.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Shockingly Terrible!

  • By Geoff on 12-05-16

Captivating

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-01-17

Very enjoyable and interesting from start to finish. A dreadful story, told brilliantly. You will not be disappointed.

  • Green River, Running Red

  • By: Ann Rule
  • Narrated by: Barbara Caruso
  • Length: 19 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 119
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 94
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 94

In the most extraordinary journey Ann Rule has ever undertaken, America's master of true crime has spent more than two decades researching the story of the Green River Killer, who murdered more than 49 young women. Green River, Running Red is a harrowing account of a modern monster, a killer who walked among us undetected. It is also the story of his quarry -- of who these young women were and who they might have become.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Green River Running Red Ann Rule

  • By jennifer on 16-10-12

True crime for housewives.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-10-16

Plods through the story of the Green River Killer. Overly descriptive and convoluted. Unnecessarily sentimental.

Entire chapters are devoted to barely relevant events that could be summed up in a paragraph. A psychic, for example, has a lead role in the tale, though this person seems barely relevant and a side note in the actual facts of the case. The author seems to enjoy mentioning needless information about politics, I'm assuming to attempt to place the reader into the time and place. This seems like such a pointless literary device that feels like reading someone's school work.

The author bombards you with more names and descriptions of locations than could possibly be remembered, to the extent that any obvious timeline has been lost, and any scale of the murders is impossible to gauge. After all the waffling, chapters often end abruptly with no conclusion or summation at all.

The narration is fitting, in that it is also poor. It sounds like you are listening to an episode of "Murder She Wrote".

I wish I could like this book, because it's such an interesting case, but it seems to be more about the author that the Green River Killer.

Be prepared to be disappointed.

4 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Mob Boss

  • The Life of Little Al D'arco, the Man Who Brought Down the Mafia
  • By: Jerry Capeci, Tom Robbins
  • Narrated by: Michael Prichard
  • Length: 16 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 125
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 113
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 112

Alfonso "Little Al" D'Arco, the former acting boss of the Luchese crime family, was the highest-ranking mobster to ever turn government witness when he flipped in 1991. His decision to flip prompted many others to make the same choice, including John Gotti's top aide, Salvatore "Sammy the Bull" Gravano, and his testimony sent more than fifty mobsters to prison. In Mob Boss, award-winning news reporters Jerry Capeci and Tom Robbins team up for this unparalleled account of D'Arco's life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best mob book for a long time!

  • By Philip on 29-03-15

First class

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-09-16

I'd rank this as just as good as "I heard you paint houses" and "the five families". I didn't want it to end.