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G. J. Krupa

  • 9
  • reviews
  • 20
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  • 154
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Derivative, anachronistic, entertaining

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-05-20

This book has a lot of flaws. It's a bit of a random collection of ideas from other stories. There's a bit of James Bond spycraft (including a Q-like character), there's a lot of politics reminiscent of Dune, Deathstalker or Farseer and a bunch of psychic powers also very much like those three with a touch of steampunk thrown in for good measure. The author doesn't quite seem sure whether to use modern or pseudo-medieval vernacular. All that said, I enjoyed it a lot since it's wraps up a compelling story with a cast of characters you can get behind.

1 person found this helpful

Good but let down by the narrator's S sounds

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-09-19

It's the great quality I've come to expect from Aaronovitch with a German slant but I found that the narrator's very harsh, hissy S sounds made listening to this in the car quite painful. Also, at the end the narrator says that there's an excerpt from Rivers of London but there isn't.

Should have given up 2 series ago

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-09-19

I found myself listening to series 10 and 11 out of a sense of completionism but really lost any sense of enjoyment when they did the always desperate move of rejigging the whole cast. The characters have always been caricatures but have become ever more one dimensional as the series progressed and the stories are increasingly clichéd tropes. My advice: pretend they cancelled it after series 9 instead of 12.

Just not funny

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-04-19

I'm normally a fan of Mark Watson but aside from a few moments (e.g. Romesh Ranganathan as a clueless yogi) it just didn't appeal at all. Easter eggs like the characters from earlier sketches cropping up in the background also normally appeal but here they just served to reming me of earlier failures to make me laugh.

1 person found this helpful

Excellent narration, not an engaging story

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-10-17

Kobna Holdbrook-Smith is an excellent narrator as always but the material doesn't live up to the usual standard. The story just lacked the spark that has made Rivers of London one of my favourite UF series and I found myself frequently losing interest.

Lacked direction

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-05-17

I've been a long time fan of the Jane Yellowrock series and found this one a little disappointing. It had its moments and Khristine Hvam provided excellent narration as always but the plot seemed to be all over the place. While there was a central story arc it didn't seem to keep the narrative focused and the various sub plots just seemed to be there to fill space. In the end I was left unsatisfied and with too many deliberately unanswered questions. It felt like this book is meant as a lead up to the next but it only really introduced that kind of anticipatory tension in the last chapter and seemed to deliver more of a "light" version of what's to come.

2 people found this helpful

Entertaining but maudlin

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-10-16

I enjoyed the premise of the story and the (very expansive) world created to contain it but can't help thinking the story could have been told in half the time. Having a certain level of introspection is one of the great things that sets books apart from films but this work takes it to extremes and, along with Gartston's overwhelmingly poetic, morose and morbid bent, makes the whole experience seem to just drag on (pun intended). It sort of reminds me of American Gods (which I'll admit I didn't enjoy) but trying too hard. I'd like to hear more from this series but only with a significant change of pace.

5 people found this helpful

Great but where are books 4-7?

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-01-16

Why on Earth does Audible have books 1-3 and 8 but not those in between?

11 people found this helpful

Great series continues

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-09-15

What made the experience of listening to Lies Ripped Open the most enjoyable?

This series never disappoints with just the right mix of action, lore and that agonisingly slow reveal of Nate's past. The parallel stories keep getting better each time though this one doesn't quite match up to the WW2 story in Prison of Hope.

What other book might you compare Lies Ripped Open to, and why?

Like many fans of urban fantasy I can't help but use Jim Butcher as the yardstick and this does remind me a little bit of the conspiracy and voyage to the heart of the organisation's domain in Turn Coat. Having characters called Hendricks and Mac add to this along with the increasing significance of Nate's best friend's daughter (and I have the feeling that by naming Manannan Mac Lir as Mac, a big secret in the Dresden Files might just have been spoiled).

What does James Langton bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

James Langton is one of my favourite audiobook narrators and definitely brings the character to life in a way that my internal narration doesn't. I read Prison of Hope before listening and I'm glad I bought the audiobook for that one as well. Once or twice I actually found his voice continuing to narrate other things in my head as I read them - it's very odd imagining someone else's voice reading Facebook posts. His pronunciation was a little... quirky in some places though, particularly his switching between Erebus and Erberus and his odd (at least to me) use of a long 'o' in coven. His accents are generally convincing enough and he doesn't overdo the female voices like some narrators I've heard.

Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

As always, Hellequin invokes a sense of righteous anger and the feeling that justice has been done (or at least the good fight was adequately fought) - he's an anti-hero you can get behind. The humour is also always pitched just right though it never quite seems to gel with Hellequin's fearsome reputation.

Any additional comments?

Spoiler: Contains the most flagrant use of the word 'cockwomble' in modern literature.