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Wras

  • 338
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  • 3,042
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  • 456
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  • How Do You Like Me Now?

  • By: Holly Bourne
  • Narrated by: Tuppence Middleton
  • Length: 8 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 179
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 157
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 156

There's no doubt that Tori is winning the game of life. She's inspired millions of women to stick two fingers up at convention with her best-selling memoir, and she has the perfect relationship to boot. But Tori Bailey has been living a lie. Everyone around her is getting married and having babies, but her long-term boyfriend won't even talk about getting engaged. And when her best friend Dee - her plus one, the only person who understands the madness - falls in love, suddenly Tori's in terrifying danger of being left behind.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent Narrator - not the story for me

  • By MuddledMummyMoss on 21-09-18

Sinical,desperate female representation.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-10-18

All the worst traits of self-hate presented as humor is a dish I could not eat much less laugh about it. An acid distillation of pure unhappiness that darkened my day, so I let it.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • I Am Watching You

  • By: Teresa Driscoll
  • Narrated by: Elizabeth Knowelden
  • Length: 8 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,728
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,579
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,576

When Ella Longfield overhears two attractive young men flirting with teenage girls on a train, she thinks nothing of it - until she realises they are fresh out of prison and her maternal instinct is put on high alert. But just as she's decided to call for help, something stops her. The next day, she wakes up to the news that one of the girls - beautiful, green-eyed Anna Ballard - has disappeared.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Glowing Five Stars

  • By Caroline Mitchell on 23-10-17

Assumptions and lies

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-10-18


Entertaining, a thriller with a few twists and a few cliches that take you to a satisfactory ending.

A good beginning with an ok plot that uses too much obvious manipulation by the author, the characters are realistic, but like most modern thrillers the voyeuristic aspects of the story are a bit exploitative, for my taste.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Normal People

  • By: Sally Rooney
  • Narrated by: Aoife McMahon
  • Length: 7 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 401
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 364
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 364

Connell and Marianne grow up in the same small town in rural Ireland. The similarities end there; they are from very different worlds. When they both earn places at Trinity College in Dublin, a connection that has grown between them lasts long into the following years. This is an exquisite love story about how a person can change another person's life - a simple yet profound realisation that unfolds beautifully over the course of the novel. It tells us how difficult it is to talk about how we feel and it tells us - blazingly - about cycles of domination, legitimacy and privilege. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good

  • By Anonymous User on 15-10-18

It plunges under your skin and invades you.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-10-18

There is nothing normal about this book; it is more than it should be, deep, turbulent, complex, still and full of subtleties that are furthermore making me think, making me worried for both of the main characters.

A beautiful exploration of human frailty and the mystery of love and dependency, grief and misunderstanding, happiness and acceptance of that good when you feel undeserving of it.

A fantastic read that has left me full of melancholic fillings; absolute magic.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Love Is Blind

  • By: William Boyd
  • Narrated by: Roy McMillan
  • Length: 11 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 212
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 198
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 197

Penguin presents the audiobook edition of Love Is Blind by William Boyd. Love Is Blind is William Boyd's sweeping, heart-stopping new novel. Set at the end of the 19th century, it follows the fortunes of Brodie Moncur, a young Scottish musician, about to embark on the story of his life. When Brodie is offered a job in Paris, he seizes the chance to flee Edinburgh and his tyrannical clergyman father, and begin a wildly different new chapter in his life. In Paris, a fateful encounter with a famous pianist irrevocably changes his future - and sparks an obsessive love affair with a beautiful Russian soprano, Lika Blum.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Boyd on Top Form

  • By Mark on 27-09-18

We see very little when we want to.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-10-18


This is not my usual taste in books but it was written by William Boyd, and that makes it something I would explore. I was not disappointed.

The story is a beautiful period piece that describes time and places in a beautiful way and develops a plot and characters you naturally care for; Brodie Moncur became real and his travels and period became alive, and his fictitious life was real for a few spackling hours.

A definite yes, if you like good writing and something delicate.

  • First Love Last Rites

  • By: Ian McEwan
  • Narrated by: Mark Meadows
  • Length: 5 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars 3
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    2.5 out of 5 stars 2

Taut, brooding and densely atmospheric, these stories show us the ways in which murder can arise out of boredom, perversity can result from adolescent curiosity and sheer evil might be the solution to unbearable loneliness. 

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • You’ll hate yourself for reading it

  • By Hurtle on 01-12-18

Perverted amoral tails

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-09-18

Content.
"Solid Geometry" A twisted murder with sexual overtones.

"First Love, Last Rites" Pregnant rats and lovemaking, anyone's cup of tea?

"Last Day of Summer" Desperate people find comfort on each other but have limited fillings for any person; this one is to my taste the most approachable but by no means expect any ordinary outcome or happiness.

"Butterflies" paedophilia and murder or an afternoon by the canal absolutely horrible; an exploration of the worst in humanity as if it was an unfortunate occurrence.

"Homemade" incest normalised for no reason with no moral, just incest.
"Cocker at the Theatre" the comedy, in the form of porno theatre. not funny.

"Disguises" cross-dressing a child by force, first awakenings all confused, no point just a tale that is inconclusive.

A very disappointing collection that took me places I had no need to go and left me cold and empty.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Slow Horses

  • Slough House, Book 1
  • By: Mick Herron
  • Narrated by: Sean Barrett
  • Length: 9 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 931
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 870
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 866

Slough House is Jackson Lamb’s kingdom; a dumping ground for members of the intelligence service who’ve screwed up: left a secret file on a train, blown surveillance, or become drunkenly unreliable. They’re the service’s poor relations – the slow horses – and bitterest among them is River Cartwright, whose days are spent transcribing mobile phone conversations.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • More Smiley than Pilgrim

  • By Robert on 17-08-17

Politically correctness, almost killed the book

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-09-18

We live in a funny time where writers must self-flagellate if they use terrorism as a plot device unless they make it a totally devoid of reality; so they are made to write Terrorist plots perpetrated by groups that have not ever committed terrorism to be fair to groups that have, making the story a parody of what it would be if written with true headline protagonists, I am sorry to say that this is one those books.
I only hope that the next book is not compromised by the Voldemort effect and allows the good characters shine instead of being PC.

  • Fear

  • Trump in the White House
  • By: Bob Woodward
  • Narrated by: Robert Petkoff
  • Length: 12 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 993
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 877
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 872

The inside story on President Trump, as only Bob Woodward can tell it. With authoritative reporting honed through eight presidencies from Nixon to Obama, author Bob Woodward reveals in unprecedented detail the harrowing life inside President Donald Trump’s White House and precisely how he makes decisions on major foreign and domestic policies. Woodward draws from hundreds of hours of interviews with firsthand sources, meeting notes, personal diaries, files and documents. The focus is on the explosive debates and the decision-making in the Oval Office, the Situation Room, Air Force One and the White House residence. 

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Nothing groundbreaking

  • By Amazon Customer on 23-09-18

A balanced look at imperial dysfunction

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-09-18

A very well written account of a time in history that reads like a novel, but is based in one of the stranges events of our period, a detailed view of how Trump was moved into the presidency of America and a look at how the dysfunction of that election has permeated the governance of the United States.
The media has focused on a few events and comments made about Trump, but this is an ensemble of this function that has many layers if anything Trump is described with compassion because through all his shortcomings he is a tragedy of mental illness and ignorance being used by the powers that surround him.
This book also shows a more complex set of players than the two-tone presented by the two tribes; we are presented with the intricacies of world power and the historical responsibilities this entails. Also, the dangers of not understanding that money is not the ultimate power but one of many.
I am sure the second part of this story will be just as thrilling, but will we survive it?

3 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Moskva

  • By: Jack Grimwood
  • Narrated by: Daniel Weyman
  • Length: 13 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 86
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 83
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 83

Red Square, 1985. The naked body of a young man is left outside the walls of the Kremlin: frozen solid - like marble to the touch - and missing the little finger from his right hand. A week later Alex Marston, the headstrong 15-year-old daughter of the British ambassador, disappears. Army intelligence officer Tom Fox, posted to Moscow to keep him from telling the truth to a government committee, is asked to help find her. It's a shot at redemption. But Russia is reluctant to give up the worst of her secrets.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting

  • By Steph H on 23-02-17

The Russians are back and they are bad to the bone

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-09-18

Russia is back in the news and the comfort of an old enemy is welcome by writers, you can make them as bad as you like and have no political correctness thrown at you, plus we have the history that is still influencing the future we understand not that new clouded religious terror and all the unmentionables of our new Orwellian reality.

So here we have an old fashion thriller with villains we can mention without the fear of starting a racist protest or having to make our guys into the instigators of the evil.

Entertaining and well paced if not fresh.

  • Need to Know

  • By: Karen Cleveland
  • Narrated by: Mia Barron
  • Length: 9 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 121
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 113
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 115

Vivian Miller is a dedicated CIA counterintelligence analyst assigned to uncover Russian sleeper cells in the United States. On track for a much-needed promotion, she's developed a system for identifying Russian agents - seemingly normal people living in plain sight. After accessing the computer of a potential Russian operative, Vivian stumbles on a secret dossier of deep-cover agents within America's borders. A few clicks later, everything that matters to her is threatened.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not Just One But Two Great Discoveries!

  • By Simon on 26-01-18

The need to manipulate readers

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-09-18

This could have been such a good book; It has good characters, a plot that should have been a joy to develop and thrilling. Instead, we get a plot so convoluted it requires many explanations and characters that are marionettes of the writer who continually frustrate the reader by pointing one way but never delivering a logical or satisfactory change, plus it is insulting to women that are professionals by describing a character with so many doubts and weaknesses that she would be in psychiatric care not in the CIA, every decision she makes is the opposite of any person with some training, her husband is described in a very obvious way but then we are told he really is not that way and that is that.

As a thriller it fails, as a feminist story, it is a travesty, as a spy story, it is laughable.

  • My Purple Scented Novel

  • By: Ian McEwan
  • Narrated by: Ian McEwan
  • Length: 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 12
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13

‘You will have heard of my friend the once celebrated novelist Jocelyn Tarbet, but I suspect his memory is beginning to fade...You’d never heard of me, the once obscure novelist Parker Sparrow, until my name was publicly connected with his. To a knowing few, our names remain rigidly attached, like the two ends of a seesaw. His rise coincided with, though did not cause, my decline...I don’t deny there was wrongdoing. I stole a life, and I don’t intend to give it back. You may treat these few pages as a confession.’ 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Short, sweet and sour; the perfect novella

  • By Wras on 10-09-18

Short, sweet and sour; the perfect novella

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-09-18

Many books of hundreds of pages never deliver the punch this few pages have, perfect sarcasm, well-developed plot, characters that come off the page, entertaining and proof that writing can be majestic.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful