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  • 41
  • reviews
  • 16
  • helpful votes
  • 51
  • ratings
  • The Woman in Black

  • By: Susan Hill
  • Narrated by: Paul Ansdell
  • Length: 4 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,023
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 677
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 687

Eel Marsh house stands alone, surveying the windswept salt marshes beyond Nine Lives Causeway. Once, Mrs Alice Drablow lived here as a recluse. Now, Arthur Kipps, a junior solicitor with a London firm, is summoned to attend her funeral, unaware of the tragic and terrible secrets which lie behind the house's shuttered windows.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Great Listen.

  • By Elizabeth on 07-04-08

Spooky

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-05-18

I was expecting this to a be scarier, given the reputation of the play, but it was still spooky enough for me, I guess. Very gothic, with great descriptions and a haunting plot. The narration was great. I wish there had been more time given to the final few chapters, which felt rushed and not fully fleshed out.

  • Midwinterblood

  • By: Marcus Sedgwick
  • Narrated by: Julian Rhind-Tutt
  • Length: 5 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 20

Have you ever had the feeling that you've lived another life? Been somewhere that has felt totally familiar even when you've never been there before, or felt that you've known someone even though you are meeting them for the first time? In a novel comprising seven parts, each of them influenced by a moon, and travelling from 2073 back in time to the dark of the moon and the days of Viking saga, this is the story of Eric and Merle who have loved and lost one another and who have been searching for each other ever since.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Gripping

  • By Claire on 07-04-13

Just Okay

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-05-18

I wasn't blown away by this. It was pretty entertaining, and a nice story, but just not all that, honestly. The narration was quite good, but the characters weren't compelling enough. Every time I got interested in a new chapter/era, it was over before it began.

  • Double Indemnity

  • By: James M. Cain
  • Narrated by: James Naughton
  • Length: 3 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8

Tautly narrated and excruciatingly suspenseful, Double Indemnity gives us an X-ray view of guilt, of duplicity, and of the kind of obsessive, loveless love that devastates everything it touches. First published in 1936, this novel reaffirmed James M. Cain as a virtuoso of the roman noir.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great listen

  • By Amazon Customer on 20-08-18

Classic Noir

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-05-18

The narration left a little to be desired, but this was a fun read nonetheless. Short and tense, with enough twists and turns to keep you on your toes. I need to go rewatch the film now.

  • The Bad Beginning

  • A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 1
  • By: Lemony Snicket
  • Narrated by: Tim Curry
  • Length: 2 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 185
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 117
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 116

I am sorry to tell you that this audiobook is extremely unpleasant. It tells an unhappy tale about three unlucky children. Even though they are charming and clever, the Baudelaire siblings lead lives filled with misery and woe. One might say that they are magnets for misfortune. On this recording alone, the three youngsters encounter a greedy and repulsive villain, itchy clothing, a disastrous fire, a plot to steal their fortune, and cold porridge for breakfast.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Lived up to the books incredibly

  • By Tao Wilkins on 22-08-15

Wish I'd read them as a kid!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-05-18

I was too old for these when they came out, and ended up finding them patronising and silly. But now, older than that, I realise how much fun they were, and can appreciate the way they put across information & vocabulary. Tim Curry's narration is a joy, too.

  • The Reptile Room

  • A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 2
  • By: Lemony Snicket
  • Narrated by: Tim Curry
  • Length: 3 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 72
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 53
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 53

This story may seem cheery at first, when the Baudelaire orphans spend time in the company of some interesting reptiles and a giddy uncle. But don't be fooled.

The three siblings endure a car accident, a terrible odour, a deadly serpent, a long knife, a large brass reading lamp, and the reappearance of a person they'd hoped never to see again.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Dark stuff, even for these books

  • By Amazon Customer on 26-04-07

So much fun!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-05-18

I didn't like this quite as much as the first, but it was still excellent! Now, if only Audible would bring back the rest of the series so I could carry on listening.

  • The Bridge of San Luis Rey

  • By: Thornton Wilder
  • Narrated by: John Chancer
  • Length: 3 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 23
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 20
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 20

An ancient bridge collapses over a gorge in Peru, hurling five people into the abyss. It seems a meaningless human tragedy; but one witness, a Franciscan monk, believes the deaths might not be as random as they appear. Convinced that the disaster is a punishment sent from Heaven, the monk sets out to discover all he can about the travellers. The five strangers were connected in some way, he thinks, so there must be a purpose behind their deaths. But are their lost lives the result of sin... or of love?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Unexpectedly and totally brilliant...

  • By Welsh Mafia on 08-05-13

Well-written but

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-05-18

Well-written but, ultimately, quite boring. The narration was quite dry, which didn't help. The stories were sprawling and not tight whatsoever. The prose was also not beautiful enough to make up for that fact.

  • Breakfast at Tiffany's

  • By: Truman Capote
  • Narrated by: Michael C. Hall
  • Length: 2 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 502
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 447
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 450

Golden Globe-winning actor Michael C. Hall ( Six Feet Under) performs Truman Capote's masterstroke about a young writer's charmed fascination with his unorthodox neighbor, the "American geisha" Holly Golightly. Holly - a World War II-era society girl in her late teens - survives via socialization, attending parties and restaurants with men from the wealthy upper class who also provide her with money and expensive gifts. Over the course of the novella, the seemingly shallow Holly slowly opens up to the curious protagonist.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • This is one of my favourite storis

  • By Zoska on 06-04-16

Not all that

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-05-18

I've never seen the film (I know, I know), so I had no what to expected from this book. It was pretty good in places, but Holly Golightly is definitely the original Manic Pixie Dream Girl. One-dimensional, and only existing for the male lead.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Kindred

  • By: Octavia E. Butler
  • Narrated by: Kim Staunton
  • Length: 10 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 99
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 84
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 83

Having just celebrated her 26th birthday in 1976 California, Dana, an African-American woman, is suddenly and inexplicably wrenched through time into antebellum Maryland. After saving a drowning white boy there, she finds herself staring into the barrel of a shotgun and is transported back to the present just in time to save her life. During numerous such time-defying episodes with the same young man, she realizes she's been given a challenge.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I am so glad I listened to goodreads on this.

  • By Alistair Shaw on 27-02-17

One of my favourites

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-05-18

This book might be one of my favourites now! Kim Staunton is a fantastic narrator.

It's a challenging book, making the reader/listener sympathise with characters you might not otherwise want to, and really think about why Butler is presenting situations the way she does. The main character was great - full of agency, action and emotion, and the supporting cast was equally compelling. I will probably relisten to this book some time soon.

  • A Brief History of Seven Killings

  • By: Marlon James
  • Narrated by: Robertson Dean, Cherise Boothe, Dwight Bacquie, and others
  • Length: 26 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 602
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 569
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 569

On 3 December 1976, just weeks before Bob Marley was to play the Smile Jamaica Concert to ease political tensions, seven gunmen from West Kingston stormed his house. Marley survived and went on to perform at the free concert. Not a lot was recorded about the fate of the seven gunmen, but much has been said, whispered and sung about in the streets of West Kingston.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Hope it wins Booker.

  • By Musicista on 30-09-15

Incredible

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-05-18

This book was fantastic. Really. It's one of the best I've ever listened to. Full cast, and they all pull their weight, bringing the characters alive.

This book covers a lot of ground, in both characters, and in time. And I suppose, in miles. At first I found some of the characters grating, such as Alex Pierce and Bam-Bam. But as the book went on, I felt excited about re-joining a character at the beginning of their chapters, no matter who it was. No matter what despicable things they were doing in the narrative, each voice was interesting, each character had something to say that I wanted to listen to. But I particularly had a soft spot for Nina Burgess throughout, as well as Josey Wales, despite everything. Barry too. After 1985, too, I came to enjoy Weeper's chapters, as well as John-John K.

I could have even done with 200 or 300 more pages, it was so absorbing.

  • The Bassoon King

  • My Life in Art, Faith, and Idiocy
  • By: Rainn Wilson
  • Narrated by: Rainn Wilson
  • Length: 8 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 82
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 75
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 74

For nine seasons Rainn Wilson played Dwight Schrute, everyone's favorite work nemesis and beet farmer. Viewers of The Office fell in love with the character and grew to love the actor who played him even more. Rainn founded a website and media company, SoulPancake, that eventually became a bestselling book of the same name. He also started a hilarious Twitter feed (sample tweet: "I'm not on Facebook" is the new "I don't even own a TV") that now has more than four million followers.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Nice guy but a bit pretentious

  • By Dekks on 04-07-18

Sweet & Honest

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-05-18

I'm not usually a celebrity biography kind of person, but I love the US Office, and I love Rainn Wilson. This is mostly about Wilson's formative years, rather than most of his career, though the latter is touched on. It made the book feel less gimmicky. Wilson actually had something to say about his life rather than the dreaded "I'M FAMOUS and let me tell you about the things I do when I'm being FAMOUS."

My favourite part was his childhood. He grew up in Nicaragua with his Ba'hai faith parents, owning a pet sloth amongst other wildlife. There wasn't much time spent on this, I suppose because it was when he was very young. But this had some of the more vivid imagery and great descriptions, as well as making me laugh out loud a few times (the sloth's escape ritual in particular). What an interesting childhood he had, by the sounds of it.

Overall, it was a very enjoyable autobiography. I do have some problems with it, though. Firstly, it was quite thin on the ground in a lot of places. Since it is so short, some of the information is shallow and I wished he'd spent more time going into more depth in places. Maybe he or his publishers were worried a 400 page book wouldn't sell?

Then, there was the rather blasé way he spoke about certain issues that were more delicate than he made out, as well his take on other religions. Also, the homogenous stereotyping of certain countries (the whole of Haiti "standing tall" against their poverty, "hilarious and quick to smile" (paraphrasing), this also came up around the Mosquito people, but is harder to remember details since it's right at the beginning of the book).

But it was sincere, well-narrated, and interesting.