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Mr David Newton

  • 25
  • reviews
  • 183
  • helpful votes
  • 60
  • ratings
  • Cover Her Face

  • By: P. D. James
  • Narrated by: Daniel Weyman
  • Length: 7 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 216
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 197
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 197

An Adam Dalgliesh mystery. Cover Her Face is P. D. James' debut novel, the first Adam Dalgliesh mystery, and a thrilling work of crime fiction set in the English countryside, from the best-selling author of Death Comes to Pemberley and Children of Men. From P. D. James, one of the masters of British crime fiction, comes the debut novel that introduced Scotland Yard detective Adam Dalgliesh.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • it's early

  • By Mr David Newton on 18-06-17

it's early

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-06-17

This is an early P D James book and as such is interesting.
All the features we expect and love are here, a closed community of an upper class family in the loved old home, a few working class characters. A introduction by the end of which you want to murder the victim as do all the others in the story.
The story moves along and it looks like all of them have killed her, but in the finale Dalglish declares the murder to have been committed by.......

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • The Cleaner

  • John Milton, Book 1
  • By: Mark Dawson
  • Narrated by: David Thorpe
  • Length: 8 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,228
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 2,051
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,054

Meet John Milton. He considers himself an artisan. A craftsman. His trade is murder. Milton is the man the government sends after you when everything else has failed. Ruthless. Brilliant. Anonymous. Lethal. You wouldn't pick him out of a crowd but you wouldn't want to be on his list. But now, after ten years, he's had enough - there's blood on his hands and he wants out. Trouble is, this job is not one you can just walk away from. He goes on the run, seeking atonement for his sins by helping the people he meets along the way.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Good but oddly unsatisfying

  • By Lucy on 05-11-16

poorly edited

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-06-17

I think this was a freebie from audible. As such it was better than most.
It's an interesting, though unbelievable, story which draws in real historical events and melds them into a reasonable tale.
sadly there were moments when the editor could have helped smooth odd moments that jarred.
For example I was left with the distinct impression that the hero was trying to catch a tube train home but then seems to have his car to hand to follow an ambulance to the hospital.
There were other such moments which distracted from a pleasant tale with some engaging characters.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Call for the Dead

  • By: John le Carré
  • Narrated by: Michael Jayston
  • Length: 4 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 876
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 744
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 742

This novel, set in London in the late 1950s, finds George Smiley engaged in the humdrum job of security vetting. But when a Foreign Office civil servant commits suicide after an apparently unproblematic interview, Smiley is baffled. Refusing to believe that Fennan shot himself soon after making a cup of cocoa and asking the exchange to telephone him in the morning, Smiley decides to investigate – only to uncover a murderous conspiracy.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A refreshing change

  • By eatough1999 on 27-01-15

not his best but interesting

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 31-05-17

This is by no means Le Carre's best work but as an early Smiley story gives an interesting background to our friend and is well worth a listen.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Only Time Will Tell

  • Clifton Chronicles, Book 1
  • By: Jeffrey Archer
  • Narrated by: Roger Allam, Emilia Fox
  • Length: 12 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,892
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,394
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,397

The Clifton Chronicles is Jeffrey Archer’s most ambitious work in four decades as an international best-selling author. The epic tale of Harry Clifton’s life begins in 1920, with the chilling words, ‘I was told that my father was killed in the war’. But it will be another twenty years before Harry discovers how his father really died, which will only lead him to question: who was his father?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great story-telling

  • By Kirstine on 16-06-11

Overpriced

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-12-16

This came as a free gift from Audible.

I was overcharged - they should be paying me to suffer this drivel.

Emelia Fox introduces the story with an hilarious "west country" accent and Roger Allam makes a fair attempt, but he has little to work with.

The story is dismal dull. I persevered until chapter 3 but by then the cliches were so thick on the ground that I could stand it no more.

The cardboard cut out characters do not endere themselves and life is too short to waste any more time on this trash.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Churchill Factor

  • How One Man Made History
  • By: Boris Johnson
  • Narrated by: Simon Shepherd
  • Length: 11 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,277
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,142
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,140

The point of The Churchill Factor is that one man can make all the difference. On the eve of the 50th anniversary of Winston Churchill's death, Boris Johnson explores what makes up the 'Churchill Factor' - the singular brilliance of one of the most important leaders of the 20th century.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Blood, toil, tears and sweat...

  • By FictionFan on 19-11-14

Compulsive listening

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 31-08-16

This is the story of a genuinely GREAT man.
It is really well told with vigour and flair. Boris makes no apology for being a fan of the great man.
He deploys several storytelling techniques to keep you asking, "and what happened next?"

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • A Small Town in Germany

  • By: John le Carré
  • Narrated by: Michael Jayston
  • Length: 13 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 336
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 314
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 315

The British Embassy in Bonn is up in arms. Her Majesty's financially troubled government is seeking admission to Europe's Common Market just as anti-British factions are rising to power in Germany. Rioters are demanding reunification, and the last thing the Crown can afford is a scandal. Then Leo Harting - an embassy nobody - goes missing with a case full of confidential files. London sends Alan Turner to control the damage, but he soon realises that neither side really wants Leo found - alive.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Slow to start but worth sticking with

  • By Steve Hocking on 18-07-17

okay

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-03-16

john Le Carre tells a good tale, but this is not his best. The end is, as often with Le Carre, disappointing as it Peters out.
Michael Jayson reads brilliantly as ever.

7 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • The Trouble with Goats and Sheep

  • By: Joanna Cannon
  • Narrated by: Paula Wilcox
  • Length: 11 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,519
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,418
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,418

England,1976. Mrs Creasy is missing, and The Avenue is alive with whispers. As the summer shimmers endlessly on, 10-year-olds Grace and Tilly decide to take matters into their own hands. And as the cul-de-sac starts giving up its secrets, the amateur detectives will find much more than they imagined.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 1976 - long, hot and a wonderful experience

  • By Kaggy on 05-04-16

First Rate in Every Way

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-03-16

This beautifully written story is both intriguing and charming.
The story moves between two incidents 9 years apart and beguiles the listener by telling the whole story through the eyes of a ten year old, whose desire to discover the truth is only exceeded by the listener's own interest in the outcome.
Most significantly for me, as a listener to audio books for 30 years was the excellent performance of Paula Wilcox as our reader. Her reading is lively and makes every character distinct. It's the first time I've heard her read, but I will be searching for more from here.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Story of the Jews: Finding the Words, 1000 BCE - 1492

  • By: Simon Schama
  • Narrated by: Andrew Sachs, Saul Reichlin
  • Length: 21 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 70
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 63
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 63

It is a story like no other: an epic of endurance against destruction, of creativity in oppression, joy amidst grief, the affirmation of life against the steepest of odds. It spans the millennia and the continents - from India to Andalusia and from the bazaars of Cairo to the streets of Oxford. It takes you to unimagined places: to a Jewish kingdom in the mountains of southern Arabia; a Syrian synagogue glowing with radiant wall paintings; the palm groves of the Jewish dead in the Roman catacombs.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Part of the history of the Jews.

  • By Teresa Cooper on 15-01-16

Don't waste your money

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-01-16

First the Reading - always important to those of us who are addicted to audible.
It's a game of two halves.
When I saw that Simon Schama I thought that the reading would be better - but no. Andrew Sachs reads like a man who has been poked in the eye and hit on the head far too often. He has no characterisation and provides no rise and fall in his voice. He breaks sentances in the wrong places and generally sounds like a man merely reading words, but having no understanding of the topic.
Thankfully he only reads the first part and is followed by Saul Reichlin, who does a much better job. It's hard to know if he reads it well, or just better than Andrew Sachs.

Now for the content.
I listen to a lot of history on Audible. Mainly the Great Courses series, which are proper academics at the top of their subject. Some take the broad sweep and deal with the rise and fall of kingdoms, the movements of people and the causes of those great themes. Others deal with social history diving in for a close up of the daily life and minutiae of ordinary people.
Sadly Simon Schama does neither of these.
A big story needs a big picture, and there is no greater story than the story of the Jewish people. Triumphant, pivotal in many empires and influencing the whole of world history and human culture the Jewish people have never been safe, but have always survived. The way in which empires have risen and fallen around them, the rise of monotheism.
But this is a little book about little people. We are introduced to dozens, maybe hundreds of people who happen to have written a shopping list or a note to their son and whose note has happened to survive.
Schama leaps around the world and through time to confuse the listener.
It's like being at a party with a hundred strangers. You just get chatting to one you think is interesting when the host whips them away and you are left with the village bore.

If you enjoy listening to audio books, you will hate this reading.
If you enjoy history, of any kind, you will be frustrated by this book.

My advise - don't waste your money.

23 of 30 people found this review helpful

  • John le Carré

  • The Biography
  • By: Adam Sisman
  • Narrated by: Michael Jayston
  • Length: 26 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 205
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 188
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 183

In this definitive biography - blessed by John le Carré himself - Adam Sisman reveals the man behind the best-selling persona. In John le Carré, Sisman shines a spotlight on David Cornwell, an expert at hiding in plain sight - "born to lying," he wrote in 2002, "bred to it, trained to it by an industry that lies for a living, practiced in it as a novelist."

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Riveting

  • By Francis on 21-10-15

Not a Nice Man

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-12-15

Where does John le Carré rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

This was a very interesting life story.

Who was your favorite character and why?

The author begins by explaining that John Le Carre's grandfather was a hypocritical liar and like father like son Le Carre's father was also a fraudster and a liar.
This sets us up for the ultimate storyteller. He explains often that it is difficult for Le Carre to distinguish between his own recollection and his 'storytelling version' of his life.
"Other people's recollections differ." seems to be the order of the day.
As the story unfolds it necessarily becomes sycophantic in feel and just as you feel that things are getting too weighted that way the author reminds you that we are dealing with a self important individual, who would like to be considered as one of the high art literature set, but in reality is a great storyteller of page turners for the ordinary person.
So we get a statement from his publishers to the effect that Le Carre has never submitted his books for consideration for literary prizes. Immediately the author reminds us that prize givers can always call in a book if they consider it worth consideration!
We also hear, in close proximity, that Le Carre received $2.1 million for the American rights to one of his books and that whilst researching his next book one of his guides generously asks that Le Carre donate the fee, he would have been paid, to a children's charity in the African country where the next book is to be set. The guide, we are told, was expecting that he would have received "about $1000" but was amazed that Le Carre donated £25,000. It is not said that this is a paltry sum from this man whose father and grandfather were grasping greedy fraudsters, but the conclusion cannot be missed.

Have you listened to any of Michael Jayston’s other performances? How does this one compare?

As always Michael Jayston reads with confidence and great characterisation. He offers just enough nuance to remind the listener that we are hearing the words Le Carre would like us to hear, though they may not be entirely accurate.

Any additional comments?

It is hard at times to distinguish between what is true, in that it really happened and what is Le Carre's excuse.
Two things are clear. John Le Carre is an expert storyteller, but not a nice man.

6 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • The United States and the Middle East: 1914 to 9/11

  • By: Salim Yaqub, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Salim Yaqub
  • Length: 12 hrs and 25 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19

At the dawn of World War I, the United States was only a rising power. Our reputation was relatively benign among Middle Easterners, who saw no imperial ambitions in our presence and were grateful for the educational and philanthropic services Americans provided. Yet by September 11, 2001, everything had changed. The United States had now become the unquestioned target of those bent on attacking the West for its perceived offenses against Islam. How and why did this transformation come about?

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Can this man read?

  • By Mr David Newton on 11-07-15

Can this man read?

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-07-15

What disappointed you about The United States and the Middle East: 1914 to 9/11?

Generally I enjoy the 'Great Courses' but in this case, whilst there was a good coverage of the facts of the history, there was little or no insight or opinion offered.
Add to this the fact that the speaker, who presumably had written the course, didn't seem to be able to read his notes and repeatedly tripped up over his text, this proved extremely distracting and annoying.

What could The Great Courses have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

Get a speaker who has some insight and can read.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful