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Stuart

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  • 6
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  • 4
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  • A History of England from the Tudors to the Stuarts

  • By: Robert Bucholz, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Robert Bucholz
  • Length: 24 hrs and 32 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 111
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 105
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 104

During the 229-year period from 1485 to 1714, England transformed itself from a minor feudal state into what has been called "the first modern society" and emerged as the wealthiest and most powerful nation in the world. Those years hold a huge and captivating story. The English survived repeated epidemics and famines, one failed invasion and two successful ones, two civil wars, a series of violent religious reformations and counter-reformations, and confrontations with two of the most powerful monarchs on earth, Louis XIV of France and Philip II of Spain.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Be ready to press pause ...

  • By Mr on 28-07-14

Highly informative and enlightening

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-12-17

Ever wondered what happened between the middle ages and the modern era look no further.

  • Polishing the Mirror

  • By: Ram Dass, Rameshwar Das
  • Narrated by: Ram Dass, Rameshwar Das
  • Length: 8 hrs and 10 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 26
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23

Sometimes illumination occurs spontaneously or, as Ram Dass experienced, in a cosmic moment of the heart opening. More commonly, it happens when we remove the dust from the mirror of our spiritual heart with daily practice - to see beyond the illusion of our transient thoughts and emotions to the vast and luminous landscape of our true nature.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Perfect if you have the environment and space

  • By Stuart on 09-02-17

Perfect if you have the environment and space

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-02-17

One of the things that drew me to Ram Dass was his effervescent smile. I learned his name while reading about Timothy Leary and their experiments with mushrooms and LSD.

Ram Dass, was a high achieving individual in his previous alias as Richard Alpert. Being financially, well off and highly regarded undoubtedly gives a person a vantage point with which to experiment.

For many of us however, Its hard being spiritual when it takes all your effort to be "you." However if you are able to get away from life's letdowns (so to speak) this book is a perfect start.

Written with vast experience Ram Dass has throughout the book stayed away from the esoteric, and emphasised the practical. I never once however felt patronized at all.

One thing that may be helpful to the reader with this audio book would be a vocabulary list to accompany it. As with a specialized technology, Buddhist practice has an efficient lexicon to focus the student. A whole new book perhaps?

Summary, I've done it again; chosen another book I've enjoyed immensely and learnt a lot from. I've got my vocabulary book ready and I'm about to add a few words to it.

All the best and thank you Ram Dass

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Midnight in Peking

  • The Murder That Haunted the Last Days of Old China
  • By: Paul French
  • Narrated by: Crawford Logan
  • Length: 8 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 142
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 116
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 117

Who killed Pamela Werner? On a frozen night in January 1937, in the dying days of colonial Peking, a body was found under the haunted watchtower. It was Pamela Werner, the teenage daughter of the city’s former British consul, Edward Werner. Her heart had been removed. A horrified world followed the hunt for Pamela’s killer, with a Chinese-British detective team pursuing suspects including a blood-soaked rickshaw puller, the Triads, and a lascivious grammar school headmaster. But the case was soon forgotten amid the carnage of the Japanese invasion...by all but Edward Werner.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Incredible story

  • By Caroline on 09-02-13

A worthy first foray into the talking book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-12-14

Would you listen to Midnight in Peking again? Why?

The story was exceptionally detailed and re-reading may gather up more details than on first listen. The book didn't take long for me to get through, as I travel an hour to and from work on public transport. At least I wont be dangerous as I focus on the story!

What other book might you compare Midnight in Peking to, and why?

The book most reminds me of Empire Made Me by Robert Bickers. This was the first book I ordered as an e-book over in China. The two books are cross over the same time period in the same country. The two non-fiction books used detailed historical references, letters and notes to support the narrative.

What about Crawford Logan’s performance did you like?

The narrators performance was exemplary. It couldn't be better and I eagerly await more books read meticulously by him.

Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

I developed great empathy with Mr Werner, for his loss but also a huge amount of respect for the strength of character he showed throughout his search for the truth and the culture and background he had, that had made him that way. It reminded me of a stronger more resolved version of myself. A character to aspire to. I felt sickened at Mr. Han's creative derailment of the investigation, and Officer Botham's unprofessional and brutish drunken man-handling of the witnesses. I felt revulsion at the self-serving bureaucrats who's cowardice and self-serving actions made no sense in blackballing a man who from every angle out flanked them in class, dignity and resolve.

Any additional comments?

Class from start to finish. It was a pleasing touch that the author had a chance to speak at the end of the work. I hope that this practice is carried over onto other books as I felt it added sincerity, insight and respect for both the writer and the listener - me. Thank you very much!

3 of 3 people found this review helpful