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the typist

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  • 344
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  • Queenie

  • By: Candice Carty-Williams
  • Narrated by: Shvorne Marks
  • Length: 9 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 34
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 33

Queenie Jenkins can't cut a break. Well, apart from one from her long-term boyfriend, Tom. That's definitely just a break, though. Definitely not a breakup. Stuck between a boss who doesn't seem to see her and a family who don't seem to listen (if it's not Jesus or water rates, they're not interested) and trying to fit in two worlds that don't really understand her, it's no wonder she's struggling. She was named to be queen of everything. So why is she finding it so hard to rule her own life? 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Yess

  • By Anonymous User on 12-04-19

Rambling, dull and poorly written

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-04-19

I tried so hard to like this book. Given the fanfare in the liberal media I thought it would be right up my street. But the writing is just so uninspired. The ‘issues’ it touches upon (more like hammers upon) are introduced and explored so unsubtly. And the story - what story?! - is just a rambling mess. Queenie is undoubtably likeable but her actions are completely baseless. I didn’t buy her relationship with Tom and I felt the casual racism she endured at the hands of his family was (in 2019) utterly moronic. What kind of people would be so openly racist to a family member in this day and age when in all other respects they are a civilised, loving family? Worst of all however, having read both of Sally Rooney’s wonderful novels, I felt this book had no heart, no soul, nothing beyond the curtain for the reader to think about and chew over. Ultimately this book has nothing to say.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Utopia for Realists

  • By: Rutger Bregman
  • Narrated by: Peter Noble
  • Length: 6 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 736
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 675
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 666

We live in a time of unprecedented upheaval, when technology and so-called progress have made us richer but more uncertain than ever before. We have questions about the future, society, work, happiness, family and money, and yet no political party of the right or left is providing us with answers. So, too, does the time seem to be coming to an end when we looked to economists to help us define the qualities necessary to create a successful society. We need a new movement.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best book I have ever read bar none.

  • By Andrew Stuart on 30-06-17

Brilliant, barmy & blindingly obvious

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-04-19

I wish Rutger could step in and sort Brexit. And Trump. And any other number of crazy populist leaders current ruining the world.

This book is a clear call to arms for those of us looking for a way out of the madness of our times. Unfortunately the advice the author gives is so simple and truthful that it’s unlikely our Machiavellian political leaders would ever go for something so transparent and easy to apply. They’d much rather make billions from war, endless poverty and the gradual destruction of the natural world.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Scrublands

  • By: Chris Hammer
  • Narrated by: Rupert Degas
  • Length: 13 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 174
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 164
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 163

A dead river. A dying town. A killer's secrets.... In an isolated country town ravaged by drought, a charismatic young priest opens fire on his congregation, killing five men before being shot dead himself. A year later, journalist Martin Scarsden arrives in Riversend to write a feature on the anniversary of the tragedy. But the stories he hears from the locals don't fit with the accepted version of events. Just as Martin believes he is making headway, a shocking discovery rocks the town.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best in ages.

  • By Robert E. on 07-10-18

Good writing, average story

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-03-19

Naming the lead female character Manderlay Blonde should have alerted me to the fact that the writer had no intention of creating well rounded female characters. Indeed, everyone in Scrublands reads like a cliche and the story itself is so conveniently convoluted it’s laughable at times. That said, I stuck with the book til the end as I wanted to know what really happened. Which is surely the mark of a decent yarn spinner?

  • The Wych Elm

  • By: Tana French
  • Narrated by: Paul Nugent
  • Length: 22 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 136
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 130
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 128

One night changes everything for Toby. A brutal attack leaves him traumatised, unsure even of the person he used to be. He seeks refuge at his uncle's rambling home, the Ivy House, filled with cherished memories of wild-strawberry summers and teenage parties with his cousins. But not long after Toby's arrival, a discovery is made. A skull, tucked neatly inside the old wych elm in the garden. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • excellent

  • By MS T. on 22-03-19

Long, dull and poorly narrated.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-03-19

This book needs editing. A lot of editing. So much detail, so little story. I’ve never been a huge fan of the author and this long winded, dull tome has only served to cement my feelings. The plot never gets going and although the character descriptions are penned perfectly, I just didn’t care about the people they described.

As for the narrator, I thought initially that he was being ironic doing a ‘girly’ voice for the lead’s girlfriend. But no, that’s just how he sees women clearly. Absolutely cringe inducing.

11 of 13 people found this review helpful

  • The Silent Patient

  • By: Alex Michaelides
  • Narrated by: Louise Brealey, Jack Hawkins
  • Length: 8 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 396
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 368
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 368

The Silent Patient is a shocking psychological thriller of a woman's act of violence against her husband - and of the man obsessed with uncovering her motive.... Famous artist Alicia Berenson shoots her husband in the head five times and then never speaks again. Five years later, forensic psychotherapist Theo Faber must find a way to get Alicia to talk if he wants to treat her. Only then can he unravel the shocking events of that tragic night five years before....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Clever twist

  • By Pawsthevizsla on 18-02-19

Very average book with vaguely interesting twist

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-02-19

I have no idea why this book has been heralded as the next great thriller. It’s really run-of-the-mill stuff for the vast majority of the book and the characters are paper thin throughout. Admittedly there is a nice twist, though I guessed it around half way through and I’m sure many readers will have cracked way before then. All in all a truly average read.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • A Version of the Truth

  • By: B P Walter
  • Narrated by: Christy Meyer, Emma Noakes
  • Length: 9 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 4
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4

2019: Julianne is preparing a family dinner when her son comes to her and says he’s found something on his iPad. Something so terrible, it will turn Julianne’s world into a nightmare and make her question everything about her marriage and what type of man her husband is or is pretending to be. 1990: Holly is a fresher student at Oxford University. Out of her depth and nervous about her surroundings, she falls into an uneasy friendship with a group of older students from the upper echelons of society and begins to develop feelings for one in particular....

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Sexist, poorly plotted and mind numbingly slow...

  • By the typist on 16-02-19

Sexist, poorly plotted and mind numbingly slow...

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-02-19

After a vaguely intriguing start the novel slides into autopilot and never recovers. The sex scenes are toe curling, the characters thinly veiled stereotypes and the plot practically non existent. I was a third of the way through and the wildly ineffectual lead was still whingeing about her husband’s bloody misplaced computer files. What’s thrilling about that?!

As for the descriptions of the working class family, I can only assume the writer has never met anyone of that particular class but has watched an episode of ‘Benidorm’ for research purposes.

Perhaps most worryingly of all is that a novel like this can still get published in the post MeToo era. Every single sex scene read like the incoherent ramblings of a sweaty, white, middle aged man, middle class man.

  • Twisted

  • By: Steve Cavanagh
  • Narrated by: Laurence Bouvard
  • Length: 11 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 69
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 64
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 64

Who is JT LeBeau? A best-selling crime writer whose words have gripped the world. The only mystery greater than his stories is his true identity. One woman thinks she's found him - her husband has millions in the bank and a letter for the enigmatic author. But the truth is far more twisted.... 

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Sadly not as good as Thirteen. Lacklustre reader.

  • By Sophie on 30-01-19

Unutterably stupid, banal & pointless

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-02-19

I had to read the entire book as I was waiting for the much celebrated ‘twist’ in the novel. It never materialised - unless you believe retrofitting the story to suit whatever ludicrous rubbish you come up with next constitutes a twist. I was also horribly fascinated by the paper thin characters, the casual homophobia, the achingly old fashioned gender bias and the litany of cliches wheeled out to prop up the ‘plot’. I imagine the author is laughing all the way to the bank, having conned someone into publishing this dross. Good on him :)

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Last Lecture

  • Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams - Lessons in Living
  • By: Randy Pausch, Jeffrey Zaslow
  • Narrated by: Eric Singer
  • Length: 4 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 77
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 49
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 49

Professor Randy Pausch's moving and inspirational book based on his extraordinary Last Lecture. 'We cannot change the cards we are dealt, just how we play the hand.'

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fantastic

  • By Paul on 24-12-12

Thought provoking but sadly dated

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-01-19

There is so much of value in this book but in the age of #MeToo and #Resist the author sadly comes across as misogynistic, gender biased and woefully old school (and not in a good way).

There are wonderful self help books out there that were written decades ago and yet they are timeless. Unfortunately this is not one of them. It’s full of interesting life lessons but they’re couched in anecdotes that end up making the author sound woefully out dated and subsequently very alienating.

The passage about coding is, quite frankly, cringeworthy. It just made me feel even more strongly that white, middle class men have had power and control for far too long. If the author had lived I genuinely worry whether he would have moved with the times.

  • Forty Acres

  • By: Dwayne Alexander Smith
  • Narrated by: Andre Blake
  • Length: 12 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 6
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 6

Martin Grey, a talented young lawyer, is taken under the wing of a secretive group made up of America's most powerful and esteemed black men. He's dazzled by what they have accomplished, and they think he has the potential to be one of them. They invite him for a weekend away from it all. But what he discovers, far from home, is a disturbing alternative reality which challenges his deepest convictions....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Riveting Read

  • By Christine Helfrich on 03-07-18

Absolutely atrocious!

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-11-18

I’m not sure why I kept listening. I think it was because I just couldn’t believe how bad this novel is and how stupid and insane its premise is. In an age where we get amazing, woke, literary novels about slavery like The Underground Railroad, it’s not only surprising but absolutely astounding that such a novel could get published. The author treats the subject of slavery as if it were a flippant footnote in history that’s ripe for skewing as a thrilling beach read. Deplorable.

  • Social Creature

  • By: Tara Isabella Burton
  • Narrated by: Jennifer Woodward
  • Length: 8 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 48
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 44
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 44

A friendship to die for. A Ripley story for the Instagram age set in contemporary New York: a world at once sophisticated and sordid, irresistible and irresponsible, unforgettable yet unattainable. Louise is struggling to survive in New York; juggling a series of poorly paid jobs, renting a shabby flat, being catcalled by her creepy neighbour, she dreams of being a writer. And then one day she meets Lavinia. Lavinia who has everything - looks, money, clothes, friends, an amazing apartment...

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Slickly dark and deliciously disturbing

  • By the typist on 24-10-18

Slickly dark and deliciously disturbing

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-10-18

Can't wait to read the author's next book! This is a jet black, tightly plotted social satire that's so wrong it's wonderfully right. Not sure why it's flown so far under the radar but I can only assume it's because the story has been told several times before and the allusions to Donna Tartt and Bret Easton Ellis possibly make it seem a little passé (and pointless) in the MeToo era. It's a genuinely good read however so do give it a whirl, darling (as Lavinia would say).

1 of 1 people found this review helpful