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Vicki Goodwin

winchester, Kentucky
  • 10
  • reviews
  • 21
  • helpful votes
  • 10
  • ratings
  • Transmission

  • A Supernatural Thriller
  • By: Ambrose Ibsen
  • Narrated by: Jake Urry
  • Length: 6 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 38
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 37
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 37

College students Kenji and Dylan stumble upon a strange recording in the background of an obscure song. It's a woman's voice uttering a string of seemingly random characters. Upon further inspection, the song appears to have been embedded with a hidden message. Attempting to crack the mysterious code and becoming obsessed with the recording, Kenji and Dylan set off in search of answers. With every turn in the road however, the puzzle only seems to grow more complicated.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Mediocre to stupid

  • By Amazon Customer on 17-01-17

Terror is Unexpected

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-03-17

Transmissions by Ambrose Ibsen has had me listening for the last 6 hours to Jake Urry. With chilling distinction, a woman’s voice chanting an obscure message pulls three men into an eerie situation in Minnesota. The visual and vocal hallucinations were impossibly provoking to these men.

Will this turn out to be supernatural, will the men figure out this puzzle that makes the reader jittery with the prospects of ghosts, insanity, or an online prank? When the men delve into what has happened to the mysterious woman that some hear in the background of an obscure record, and one man sees a woman staring into his eyes from the video clip as she chants. Following her clues the three come together. These three men decide to work begin to put together the pieces.

I enjoyed this story so much. It was intriguing and it kept me listening to this chilling story.
I enjoyed Kenji, Reggie, and Dylan. These three men are caught up in a situation that would seriously tax any normal people and they attempted to rise to the occasion that was presenting itself.

Jake Urry has found even more voices to add to his library of characters. As this is a stand alone book, you can start appreciating both Urry and Ibsen with this six-hour journey into the unknown. It scared me. It was intense and wicked and it did its job, It scared me. If you love eerie, mysterious, do not listen after dark, great writing, then you should pick up this audiobook.

Keep the lights on for the last hour and remember it is only an audiobook. Nothing is going to get you. I chanted that mantra until I was able to go to sleep.

  • Shadows of Tomorrow

  • By: Jessica Meats
  • Narrated by: Jake Urry
  • Length: 10 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 24
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24

Earth is at war. Portals are opening across the planet and bringing creatures known as Outsiders. Their only desire is to eat, leaving a trail of destruction in their path. The only people who can stop them are the Defenders - led by Gareth Walker - who can open portals of their own to target the Outsiders in minutes. Gareth's only advantage is an ability to see glimpses of his future.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Shadows of tomorrow

  • By med c on 20-10-16

Excellent What if stroy

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-11-16


I loved the premise and the words that were used. They conveyed the heart of the characters and the pain of their knowledge of the future. Knowing that they could change that if they varied. The setting was dismal and brought reality to the story.

The narration was wonderful, the tone of Jake Urry's voice was fitting for the emotion of the story. I enjoyed the tension and the emotion.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Portraits of the Dead

  • By: John Nicholl
  • Narrated by: Jake Urry
  • Length: 8 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 96
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 90
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 89

Emma didn't know how long he hid, silent and unmoving, in the large Victorian wardrobe to the side of her single bed. She didn't know how long he peered out, salivating and drooling, between the two heavy dark oak doors, and watched, mesmerized, as she slowly drifted into fitful sleep. She didn't know what time he pushed the doors open and crept towards her in the drab grey darkness of the night.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Delectably chilling

  • By Vicki Goodwin on 31-10-16

Delectably chilling

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 31-10-16

I have come to expect severe psychological depravity when I read John Nicholl's books. This book did not disappoint in that aspect. The evil kidnapper has taken and killed at least five other women before he took Emma. Emma is held in a darkened area without knowing day from night, hours from days and days from weeks. He insisted on servitude from her while he tortured her and taunted her. It was chilling and sickeningly fascinating. John Nicholl has a history of working as a social worker and uses the terror he faced in that career in his own stories.

While Detective Inspector Gravel searched for Emma not knowing if she was alive or dead. Reaching out to the serial Killer while looking for few clues. With trusting people listening to vague and erroneous clues, the police struggle to find this serial killer.

This book is intense. It is just so cold and creepy. It is the perfect book for me to listen to on Halloween. Only now, how am I supposed to be able to go outside moving door to door in the dark with the kids trick or treating when there are psychos out there.
It is chilling listening to Jake Urry in his concise and gravelly voice. It takes the story to a new level when Mr. Urry narrates a thriller such as this. He does an amazing job with the voices of women, older adults, young women. His range is amazing. I am really impressed with the narration.

9 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • Copper's Keeper

  • Slaughter Series, Book 3
  • By: A.I. Nasser
  • Narrated by: Jake Urry
  • Length: 4 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 20
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20

Every small town in Connecticut has its secrets, but none are as shocking as Melington's. After the riots, Melington becomes the primary target of an FBI investigation. The Council is more ruthless than the town has ever seen. And a national spotlight shines brightly on the mysterious cases of missing children.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Book 3

  • By med c on 18-09-16

Chilling Conclusion

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 31-08-16

This entire series was so distractingly scary. The voices that Jake Urry portrays will keep you looking over your shoulder. That distinctive voice taking on a totally different personality when he becomes the various characters. When he becomes the wraith, omg it was horrifying.

Those characters, what can I say about them except they scare me and make me fear the dark. The hands of Copper grabbing people around the ankles just terrifies me. Each time he shows up, I am more upset with the raspy voice and the horrible stench. A.I. Nasser has truly created a masterpiece of terror. I get pulled in and can not stop listening until the bitter end.

An excellent way to spend an evening is listening to the horror on your own. This story is hard to forget. It stays with you,

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Shadow's Embrace

  • Slaughter Series, Book 2
  • By: A.I. Nasser
  • Narrated by: Jake Urry
  • Length: 5 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 21
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 20
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 20

Six months have passed since Alan Carter woke up from the coma Copper Tibet had put him in, and much has changed in Melington. A new chairman, a power-hungry sheriff, a spineless son who struggles with the absence of his father. And children still going missing while the monster taking them roams free and unrestrained. In the small town of secrets, what had once been hidden is now slowly coming to light, and few rest easy, including Alan Carter. He is plagued by nightmares.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Book 2

  • By med c on 27-08-16

Book #2 is just as chilling and addictive as #1

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-08-16

Book 2 of the Slaughter series, picks up in Shadow's Embrace, after six months of the town being able to relax. Then all hell breaks loose. Debra Adam's mother is now head of the council and Debra is distancing herself from her mother. The search for Adam to find his sister continues. He is somehow connected to both sides and it plagues him.

The story is wonderfully scary. The dead skin, rotting breath, and boney hands make a new appearance and are creepy as can be.

This is another excellent portion of the story of the people in Melington.

I listened to this book in Audiobook format and I have to say, with Jake Urry's voice, it is a great choice. Jake's voices capture American accents, women, old, and young. It is amazing that he can individualize his voice as he does.

If you like eerie stories about what happens to the missing children, then this is a wonderful series to read, or listen to. It is a great story.

With a bonus of the next book teaser, I know I am hooked. Can't wait to read more from A. I. Nasser.

Just and excellent book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Children to the Slaughter

  • Slaughter Series, Book 1
  • By: A.I. Nasser
  • Narrated by: Jake Urry
  • Length: 6 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 24
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24

There is an evil lurking in the darkness, under the beds and behind closet doors. It seeks vengeance and retribution and will not be denied. No one knows this more than Alan Carter. Returning to his hometown after a 20-year absence, he is resolute in uncovering the truth behind his sister's abduction and the strange disappearance of children. Alan finds himself thrown into the middle of a conspiracy led by the town council as it desperately tries to hide its secrets from the world.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Sinister and very entertaining

  • By Petra on 29-07-16

Gripping, chilling, and Addictive

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-08-16

Children to the Slaughter was a creepy and interesting audiobook. With children leaving town on more than natural occasions the town has always had a history of a quick turnover in families.

When Alan Carter comes back to Melington, he keeps his cards close to his vest as he tries to figure out exactly what is going on here. His own little sister disappeared when she was little. The only witness was Alan. He never forgot the hand that pulled her down into the sandbox. His family left the town directly after her disappearance. After twenty years he returns.

Bit and pieces wiggle and meld themselves into a very intricate plot. Debra Adams, the best friend of Alan from when they were both children, is surprised to see him return. She has no clue he has more reasons than just to work.

Alan's conspiracy theory hits Debra hard and she turns away from him. There are too many strange occurrences of missing children for decades.

The story is riveting. The narration is eerily wonderful. The voices that Jake Urry presents bring a very emotional response to the tension-filled words that A.I. Nasser writes.

If you love a good horror story, with hands in the dark, turning closet doorknobs and missing children, you are going to love this book. I imagine reading it would give as many chills, but if you want the full effect, get the Audiobook. It is completely chilling.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Cryptic Lines

  • By: Richard Storry
  • Narrated by: Jake Urry
  • Length: 4 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 44
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 42
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 42

Lord Alfred Willoughby is deciding what is to become of his vast fortune after his death. Whilst his head is telling him to leave nothing at all to his wastrel son, Matthew, his heart is speaking differently. After much deliberation, in a last-ditch attempt to try and show to his son the importance of applying himself to a task and staying with it to the end, he devises a series of enigmatic puzzles cunningly concealed within the lines of a poem - the cryptic lines.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Twists, turns and unexpected results

  • By Devilish Accord on 01-05-16

Puzzles, Clues and Treasure! Well Narrated Story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-07-16

Maybe it is just me, but there is something so deliciously inviting about a scavenger type hunt. Searching for clues, second guessing every hint.

This audio book is really a fun one. There is a will that has a challenge presented in a video left by the Matthew's father.

Matthew Willoughby has not lived up to the expectations of his father Lord Alfred Willoughby. His selfishness and immaturity shines through this story.

The book is filled with interesting and somewhat secretive characters. This is my first book by Richard Storry. I like the way he writes. He uses words that evoke emotion that go along with the mysterious old mansion and the out of the way corridors they keep searching through. The clues are tied to a love of classics that Lord Alfred loves. It was well written and entertaining to follow them in their puzzle solving.

Jake Urry has presented this story in the best voices. Each one is obviously different from the others. I keep forgetting there is only one person reading this book. His voice is strong yet when he does the elderly woman Meg, I hear an elderly woman. It is a craft he is well adept at.

This is a really great book. Nicely written and narrated so nicely.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Medicine for the Dead

  • The Ulrich Files, Book 2
  • By: Ambrose Ibsen
  • Narrated by: Jake Urry
  • Length: 5 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 26
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 26
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 26

Facing tough times, private investigator Harlan Ulrich takes a job looking after a historic downtown building as a favor to an old acquaintance who's out on business. Settling into the elegant Exeter House for a week-long stay, Ulrich's apartment is beautifully furnished and situated on the top floor, giving him a great view of the city. At first, he thinks it a wonderful opportunity. He's got plenty of coffee, good books to read and the whole building to himself.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Book 2

  • By med c on 22-07-16

Story and Narration really kept me riveted.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-07-16

An Occult horror story that will keep you guessing and wondering what exactly is going on.
The detail wraps you up and create pictures that are clear and vivid images of what he describes. Not going to say too much, but I can say there are some odd, weird creatures in this book.

The protagonist is really a great guy. He is a stress eater, a teetotaler and a Private Investigator that struggles with money. I love his conversations with himself. He is his own worse critic. I get tickled at him when he starts that negative talk. He is a huge Sinatra fan, you can't beat that!

The narration, by Jake Urry, it is to me, just perfect. The voices are just so spot on. He has a full range of voices that he uses to convey the spirit of the story. The characters in the story all have distinct accents and tones.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Sick House

  • The Ulrich Files, Book 1
  • By: Ambrose Ibsen
  • Narrated by: Jake Urry
  • Length: 6 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 44
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 43
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 43

Dr. Siegfried Klein has vanished on a mysterious pilgrimage to an abandoned infirmary in the ghost-town of Moonville. The locals in the surrounding areas are tight-lipped, hostile to outsiders. Local legend has it that the old Sick House is packed with spirits, none of them friendly, and that to set foot in it is to enter Hell itself.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Highly Engaging 1st Audio Book

  • By Devilish Accord on 17-04-16

Creepy and Chilling Great Narration

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-07-16

This Horror story is grimly good. It is creepy and hearing it through my headphones, those voices ringing in my ears? intense!

The narrator, Jake Urry, has the best voices for the characters. the men all sound sinister when they should and sound intelligent and he has a large amount of accents. I love his depiction of women. Such emotion and he is able to capture all ages of the characters. For narration I can only give 5 stars.

I give the book a solid 5 stars because it was chilling and the mystery is consuming.
The writing is great. The wording keeps you involved. Some of the descriptions were so involved, I could almost hear his chair creaking as he swiveled back and forth in thought. I loved it.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • White Is the Coldest Colour

  • Dr. David Galbraith, Book 1
  • By: John Nicholl
  • Narrated by: Jake Urry
  • Length: 9 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 190
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 177
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 177

Fifty-eight year old Dr. David Galbraith, a sadistic, predatory paedophile employed as a consultant child psychiatrist, has already murdered one child in the soundproofed cellar below the South Wales Georgian townhouse he shares with his wife and two young daughters. Anthony becomes Galbraith's latest obsession and he will stop at nothing to make his grotesque fantasies reality.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Hard hitting subject, incredible story

  • By Devilish Accord on 05-06-16

Gripping and Intense Thriller

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-06-16

The depravity of the criminals come through and make you appreciate the hard work of the police and have total appreciation of the accusers and witnesses that came forward even with the danger, threats, and horror that they had to acknowledge. The little victims with the strength to speak out about what had been perpetrated against them.

John Nicholl has worked with the victims of the same horrible type of criminal. He writes a work of fiction that pulls the truths from the emotions and the horror that children faced in their real lives. THe writing of this story was riveting. I could not even sleep, I was so invested in the story. The horror of the mind of the abuser was so dirty and ugly. I did not even want him to be called crazy, that seemed like too pat an excuse. I wanted him to suffer as much as he caused suffering. Dr David Galbraith, the calculating, evil predator. Oh he is evil. When he was planning, I was physically shaking in shocked and sickened emotion. He was cold and horrible and so calculating. He manipulated both the future victims and the parents as well. It makes you mistrust those that we should trust. The Police are the saviors of these children. They were equally sickened by the deviousness of this man and people like him. They took hold of this investigation like a bulldog and refused to let go until they solved the case. This is one book that should be read, it is hard and grim, but it is a strong story that needs to be told.

In order to appreciate the narration of Jake Urry, you only have to listen for about five minutes. Once you have listened for that first few minutes you appreciate that his voice is just perfect for the story. His cadence and the sound of his voice just bring the finishing touches on the story. He has such a variety of voices in his arsonal. Perfect voices for the police, the families, and the wounded children. The narration was emotionally charged and perfectly executed.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful