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Elinor Dashwood

  • 47
  • reviews
  • 126
  • helpful votes
  • 256
  • ratings
  • Healing Back Pain

  • By: John E. Sarno M.D.
  • Narrated by: John E. Sarno M.D.
  • Length: 3 hrs and 23 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 71
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 53
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 51

With case histories and the results of in-depth mind-body research, Dr. Sarno describes how patients recognize the emotional roots of their back pain and sever the connections between mental and physical pain - and how, just by listening to this program, you may start recovering from back pain today!

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fantastic book

  • By simon o. on 27-12-13

Book doesn't deliver on the title promise

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-10-18

The contents of this book does not match the title. Most of the book can be summarized as this: your back pain is in your head. Loads of fluff and padding, but that's it. Your repressed emotions cause your back pain. I kept waiting for the "Healing your back pain" part. When it came - about fifteen minutes worth in the last half-hour of the book - it amounted to this: ignore your back pain. And if that doesn't work, get therapy.

I was sorry to have spent a full credit on this.

  • The Fever

  • By: Megan Abbott
  • Narrated by: Caitlin Davies, Kirby Heyborne, Joe Barrett
  • Length: 9 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    2.5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars 5
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 5

Deenie, Gabby and Lise are best friends - a tight girl unit negotiating their way through the troubled waters of their teens, a world of sex, secrets and intense relationships. When first Lise then Gabby falls prey to a mysterious illness, hysteria sweeps their school, and as more girls succumb, Deenie finds herself an outsider, baffled by the terrifying illness and scared that it could all be because of something she has done.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Story ok let down by narrators

  • By M. Graydon on 07-08-16

Good story, problematic narrator

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-08-18

This book is basically an examination of adolescent sexuality. I thought the story was good, and well-told, albeit a little overwritten. But the narrator who reads the chapters from the perspective of the teen girl character spoiled my listening experience. She has an annoying sing-song "upspeak" accents and a strange habit of putting the emphasis on the second-last syllable in the sentence. This, combines with putting stress on the wrong syllable in words, and the wrong words in sentences is confusing and makes her sections hard to listen to. It also then makes it difficult to like or root for her character.

I did listen to the sample before I bought and it sounded okay, but it got worse as the book progressed.

Oh, and like an earlier reviewer, I also thought the father and brother were wayyyy too focused on their daughter/sister's breasts and sexuality. Very creepy.

  • The Easy Way to Control Alcohol

  • By: Allen Carr
  • Narrated by: Richard Mitchley
  • Length: 8 hrs and 6 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 429
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 364
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 363

Allen Carr established himself as the world’s greatest authority on helping people stop smoking and his internationally best-selling Easy Way to Stop Smoking has been published in over 40 languages and sold more than 10 million copies. In his Easy Way to Control Alcohol Allen applies his revolutionary method to drinking. With startling insight into why we drink and clear, simple, step-by-step instructions, he shows you the way to escape from the ‘alcohol trap’ in the time it takes to listen to this audiobook.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Very effective, although could do with some modernisation re comparisons

  • By Karen on 11-08-15

Nothing new

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-07-18

This is an old book with very outdated references and some information that is factually incorrect with modern science. Moreover, almost all of it is padding. About 95% of the book is this: alcohol is bad for you. When you finally get to the "easy action steps", there's no magic and nothing new. Basically you're told the way to stop drinking is not to drink anymore. What a waste of a credit.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Robicheaux

  • By: James Lee Burke
  • Narrated by: Will Patton
  • Length: 13 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 68
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 62
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 61

Dave Robicheaux is a haunted man. Between his recurrent nightmares, his thoughts drift from one irreconcilable memory to the next. During a murder investigation, Dave Robicheaux discovers he may have committed the homicide he's investigating, one which involved the death of the man who took the life of Dave's beloved wife. As he works to clear his name, Robicheaux encounters a cast of characters and a resurgence of dark social forces that threaten to destroy all of those whom he loves.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Not Burke's best, but still very good

  • By Elinor Dashwood on 15-03-18

Not Burke's best, but still very good

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-03-18

This isn't the best James Lee Burke, and I found the ending a bit lame, but even on a bad day, he's a master of his craft. As usual Will Patton reads like a dream, though I do wish he'd look up how to pronounce "misogyny" correctly.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • A Secondhand Life

  • By: Pamela Crane
  • Narrated by: Melanie Carey
  • Length: 8 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 6
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 6
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 6

Suffocating beneath the weight of avenging a dead girl and catching a serial killer on the loose dubbed the "Triangle Terror," Mia must dodge her own demons while unimaginable truths torment her - along with a killer set on making her his next victim. As Mia tries to determine if her dreams are clues or disturbing phantasms, uninvited specters lead her further into danger's path, costing her the one person who can save her from herself.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Organ memory.

  • By DubaiReader on 19-02-18

Narration spoils book

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-08-17

I can't understand the raves for the narrator on this book. Please listen to the sample before you buy. Whenever the chapters or segments are from the point of view of the killer/heart donor, the narrator reads in a robotic, monotonous voice which is near impossible to listen to.

The reading perks up in chapters from the main character - but only really in dialogue, the descriptions or narrative sections are also in a monotonous voice with a staccato rhythm. So irritating! I got to chapter 6 and gave up. Up until then the story was only okay, maybe it perks up later but I can't listen to this anymore.

  • An Ember in the Ashes

  • By: Sabaa Tahir
  • Narrated by: Aysha Kala, Jack Farrar
  • Length: 13 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 210
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 195
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 196

Set in a terrifyingly brutal Rome-like world, An Ember in the Ashes is an epic fantasy debut about an orphan fighting for her family and a soldier fighting for his freedom. It's a story that's literally burning to be told. What if you were the spark that could ignite a revolution? For years Laia has lived in fear. Fear of the Empire, fear of the Martials, fear of truly living at all. Born as a Scholar, she's never had much of a choice.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Probably the next big thing in YA Fantasy

  • By Christopher on 23-06-15

Starts well, then fades

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-05-17

I thought this book started off with excellent writing, but then it lost its way a little. It was a good enough story, but there were a lot of cliches borrowed from other YA books and not a lot that was fresh or original, and I wasn't a fan of the "love square".

I was disturbed by the gratuitous use of violence. There are so many deaths (used as plot devices) that you become numbed to them, and the casual acceptance of rape combined with the endless violent victimisation of the main character begin to feel like sadistic voyeurism.

The narrators brought good expression and characterisation to their readings, BUT there were so many mispronunciations of words. So many. I can't think why the audio producer didn't edit these. Particularly irritating is the way the female narrator pronounces "says" phonetically ("s-ay-z" rather than "sez"), which just kept popping me out of my immersion in the story.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Chalk Pit

  • The Dr Ruth Galloway Mysteries 9
  • By: Elly Griffiths
  • Narrated by: Jane McDowell
  • Length: 9 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 868
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 789
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 781

Boiled human bones have been found in Norwich's web of underground tunnels. When Dr Ruth Galloway discovers they were recently buried, DCI Nelson has a murder enquiry on his hands. The boiling might have been just a medieval curiosity - now it suggests a much more sinister purpose. Meanwhile, DS Judy Johnson is investigating the disappearance of a local rough sleeper. The only trace of her is the rumour that she's gone 'underground'.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • One of my favourite series

  • By Linda on 01-03-17

Only ok

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-03-17

This wasn't a bad story but it was long-winded (lots of descriptions of driving and cheese rolls and other irrelevant details which could be cut) and the writing tended to sap the tension from the story. A couple of things bugged me, including that the author seems to have a real bugbear about religion. Do atheists really go around feeling irked and mentally commenting on religion all the time? The second thing was that this book is sooo politically correct - sometimes to absurd degrees. For example, all the homeless people (who you are not allowed to call that, you have to say all the people who are sleeping rough) are sane, kind, evolved, mature, empathic, "normal" people who have no personal problems except that they live rough. One is described as having a mild drug habit, and another as drinking, but this has no discernable impact on the way these characters speak and behave. Nobody appears to have serious mental health problems (like schizophrenia) which is arguably the reason most of these (untreated) people are on the streets.

The reader does a good job but her voice, in my opinion, is all wrong for the story - she has a very correct, jolly-hockeysticks way of speaking, and also reads very slowly.

8 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • Becoming Magic

  • A Course in Manifesting an Exceptional Life, Book 1
  • By: Genevieve Davis
  • Narrated by: Fiona Hardingham
  • Length: 1 hr and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 231
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 196
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 194

Becoming Magic is book one of a complete course in becoming creator of your own exceptional life. In this book, I outline the exact steps which enabled me to move my own life from one of poverty and drudgery, to one of previously unimaginable wealth, purpose and joy. But Magic? I do hope you are joking! That's what I would have said, five or ten years ago. I once despised all things 'New-Age'; all these spiritual types and their airy-fairy views, their bad science and their irrational beliefs.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Unrealistic for most people

  • By Devon Dolley on 20-04-15

A very long introduction

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-02-17

This amounted to a very long and vague introduction, and two pieces of advice: stop whining and start a gratitude journal. The author says she donates all profits from this book to charity - I sincerely hope that's true, because else it's a swindle.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Beautiful Dead

  • By: Belinda Bauer
  • Narrated by: Andrew Wincott
  • Length: 10 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 27
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 23
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 23

Eve Singer needs death. With her career as a TV crime reporter flagging, she'll do anything to satisfy her ghoulish audience. The killer needs death, too. He even advertises his macabre public performances, where he hopes to show the whole world the beauty of dying. When he contacts Eve, she welcomes the chance to be first with the news from every gory scene. Until she realizes that the killer has two obsessions. One is public murder. And the other one is her.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Well enough written but nonsense, don't waste your time!

  • By Gerard on 05-12-16

Not Bauer's best

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-12-16

I was disappointed by this one. It was all a bit silly and predictable, and not up to Bauer's usual standard.
I don't why, the main character being female, they chose a male narrator. He struggles with doing female voices, and reads the main character's as a sort of whisper, which makes her come across as daft and girlish, rather than as a hard-nosed reporter.

  • 13 Minutes

  • By: Sarah Pinborough
  • Narrated by: Rosie Jones
  • Length: 10 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 258
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 240
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 239

I was dead for 13 minutes. I don't remember how I ended up in the icy water, but I do know this - it wasn't an accident, and I wasn't suicidal. They say you should keep your friends close and your enemies closer, but when you're a teenage girl, it's hard to tell them apart. My friends love me, I'm sure of it. But that doesn't mean they didn't try to kill me. Does it? 13 Minutes by Sarah Pinborough is a gripping psychological thriller about people, fears, manipulation and the power of the truth.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Couldn't put it down

  • By Stephen Eedle on 21-03-16

Should carry a warning about drug use and language

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-08-16

I'm giving up on this book. There was just too much glorified drug use and bad language for me to hear the actual story. No doubt many teens do live and speak like this, but I found them so unlikeable that I couldn't care what happened to them. I do think that there should be some warning about the explicit language and content in the book description.