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AdamGR

Wales
  • 14
  • reviews
  • 8
  • helpful votes
  • 15
  • ratings
  • The Making of a Massacre

  • By: Audible Original, Ginger Thompson
  • Length: 2 hrs and 10 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 48
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 43
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 42

[Contains sensitive content] In March 2011, gunmen from one of the most violent drug trafficking cartels in the world swept through a small Mexican border town, leaving behind dozens of disappearances and deaths. This series follows ProPublica's Pulitzer Prize-winning Ginger Thompson as she investigates an instance where America's war on drugs had devastating civilian consequences.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • An Utterly Barbaric Tale

  • By Simon on 14-05-18

What happens when psychopaths have power

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-06-18

Sad and shocking tale from the war on drugs. America's role in the deaths of many innocent people. I feel sorry for ordinary Mexicans who have to live with the corruption and power mad cartels. Sheds some light on something both th American and Mexican Government are reluctant to talk about.

4 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • The Wisdom of Psychopaths

  • By: Kevin Dutton
  • Narrated by: David Timson
  • Length: 8 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 115
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 100
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 96

Psychopath. No sooner is the word out than images of murderers, suicide bombers and gangsters flash across our minds. But unlike their box-office counterparts, not all psychopaths are violent or even criminal. In fact they are fearless, confident, ruthless and focused - qualities tailor-made for success in twenty-first-century society. In this groundbreaking adventure into the world of psychopaths, renowned psychologist Kevin Dutton reveals a shocking truth: psychopaths have something to teach us.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Route to the psychopath’s mind

  • By Darius on 24-03-18

Interesting angle

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-06-18

Makes you rethink your view of psychopaths and how they operate. Sadly they are all around us but we can learn a thing or two and sometimes they have utility.

  • Fermat's Last Theorem

  • The Story of a Riddle That Confounded the World's Greatest Minds for 358 Years
  • By: Simon Singh
  • Narrated by: David Rintoul
  • Length: 8 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 108
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 101
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 101

'I have a truly marvellous demonstration of this proposition which this margin is too narrow to contain.' It was with these words, written in the 1630s, that Pierre de Fermat intrigued and infuriated the mathematics community. For over 350 years, proving Fermat's Last Theorem was the most notorious unsolved mathematical problem, a puzzle whose basics most children could grasp but whose solution eluded the greatest minds in the world.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Incredible

  • By Vijayant Singh on 01-05-17

Quite amazing

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-06-18

Interesting insight into the world of mathematicians without the math. Simon Singh is a very skilled story teller.

  • The Retreat

  • Hitler's First Defeat
  • By: Michael Jones
  • Narrated by: Simon Shepherd
  • Length: 11 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11

The thrilling history of the turning point of the Second World War, when Hitler's armies were halted on the Eastern Front. At the moment of crisis in 1941 on the Eastern Font, with the forces of Hitler massing on the outskirts of Moscow, the miraculous occurred: Moscow was saved. Yet this turning point was followed by a long retreat, in which Russian forces, inspired by old beliefs in the sacred motherland, pushed back German forces steeled by the vision of the ubermensch, the iron-willed fighter. 

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting anecdotes

  • By AdamGR on 28-06-18

Interesting anecdotes

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-06-18

A series of interesting anecdotes collected from various primary sources. Lacking in narrative direction and tension. Seemed very short as well. Not on a par with something like Anthony Beevor's Stalingrad. An easy listen but did not really come away greatly enlightened.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World

  • By: Jack Weatherford
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis, Jack Weatherford
  • Length: 14 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,131
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,000
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 998

The Mongol army led by Genghis Khan subjugated more lands and people in 25 years than the Romans did in 400. In nearly every country the Mongols conquered, they brought an unprecedented rise in cultural communication, expanded trade, and a blossoming of civilization.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazing! Wonderful! Couldn't get enough!

  • By Simone Teufel on 30-06-10

interesting

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-06-18

lacked narrative drive. very informative but no tension. could have been more creative. would like to see what someone like Tom Holland would do with this material.

  • The Road to Wigan Pier

  • By: George Orwell
  • Narrated by: Jeremy Northam
  • Length: 7 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 680
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 581
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 575

A graphic and biting polemic that still holds a fierce political relevance and impact despite being written over half a century ago. First published in 1937 it charts George Orwell's observations of working-class life during the 1930s in the industrial heartlands of Yorkshire and Lancashire. His depictions of social injustice and rising unemployment, the dangerous working conditions in the mines amid general squalor and hunger also bring together many of the ideas explored in his later works and novels.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Road to Wigan Pier

  • By M on 15-10-12

Classic social commentary

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-05-18

Surprised how many things have not changed and how some have. At least the poverty is no where near as unbearable as it was then. The right and left still don't seem to have changed much though. The sandal wearing, upper class Corbyns were around then too.

  • The Looming Tower

  • Al-Qaeda and the Road to 9/11
  • By: Lawrence Wright
  • Narrated by: Lawrence Wright
  • Length: 16 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 205
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 186
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 185

A sweeping narrative history of the events leading to 9/11, a groundbreaking look at the people and ideas, the terrorist plans and the Western intelligence failures that culminated in the assault on America. Lawrence Wright's remarkable book is based on five years of research and hundreds of interviews that he conducted in Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Sudan, England, France, Germany, Spain, and the United States.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Astounding

  • By HashTag on 03-09-18

Excellent narration and gripping account

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-05-18

Many human stories and an interesting peek into the mind of fundamentalists. Gripping and suspenseful as well as educational. Very relevant to understanding today's political climate. Learned a lot, for example about Osama Bin Laden's father who was quite a remarkable individual in his own right. Spend many a night unable to switch off as the story reached its inevitable conclusion.

  • A Spy Among Friends: Kim Philby and the Great Betrayal

  • By: Ben Macintyre
  • Narrated by: Michael Tudor Barnes
  • Length: 12 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 719
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 673
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 670

Kim Philby was the most notorious British defector and Soviet mole in history. Agent, double agent, traitor and enigma, he betrayed every secret of Allied operations to the Russians in the early years of the Cold War. Philby's two closest friends in the intelligence world, Nicholas Elliott of MI6 and James Jesus Angleton, the CIA intelligence chief, thought they knew Philby better than anyone, and then discovered they had not known him at all.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Retold with Gripping Narrative

  • By Avril Sawers on 14-10-14

Extremely entertaining

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-04-18

Although I'd head of Philby and Burgess I never knew the story was so interesting. Philby for his mysterious motives and personality and Burgess for his reckless, hedonistic behaviour. What the Americans must have thought of the British Secret Service God only knows. Hope they do better background checks these days! Great book.

  • Peak

  • Secrets from the New Science of Expertise
  • By: Robert Pool, Anders Ericsson
  • Narrated by: Geoffrey Beevers
  • Length: 10 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 555
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 496
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 482

Anders Ericsson has spent 30 years studying the special ones - the geniuses, sports stars and musical prodigies. And his remarkable finding, revealed in Peak, is that their special abilities are acquired through training. The innate 'gift' of talent is a myth. Exceptional individuals are born with just one unique ability, shared by us all - the ability to develop our brains and bodies through our own efforts.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The road is long.

  • By Amazon Customer on 02-10-16

The more you practice the...

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-01-18

OK, with a slightly cynical hat on here's my summary. The human sciences often amaze me and this is a case in point. The primary author spent decades studying what makes people succeed at different things. The conclusion: systematic (deliberate) practice makes you better. The more you do it the better you get. Natural talent is overrated. Four decades or more to tell you the obvious? Then to make it worse someone comes along called Gladwell and uses your research to make himself hugely popular. Then the double whammy, Gladwell not only uses your research to produce a successful book but he doesn't even get it right , he oversimplifies and completely misunderstands the findings in some instances. How annoying. So what does one do? Well we'll do our own book with interesting anecdotes and corrections even if Gladwell and others have already beaten you to it with some of the anecdotes. But the way round that is to point out that Gladwell has already used this anecdote, and others, but you'll repeat it anyway.

The main point of this book could have been presented in a short essay. To pad it out numerous anecdotes and sometimes dubious connections are made to pad out the thesis.

In conclusion, it's obvious the authors of this book are annoyed with Gladwell for peddling nonsense and misusing their research. Can see their point. But to then produce what is in effect a correction in book form and pad it out with interesting but not always coherently connected anecdotes Gladwell style seems self defeating.

Not a bad book, interesting but not great either but I am sure it makes the authors feel better.

  • His Bloody Project

  • By: Graeme Macrae Burnet
  • Narrated by: Crawford Logan, Cameron Mowat
  • Length: 10 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,198
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,110
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,105

A brutal triple murder in a remote Scottish farming community in 1869 leads to the arrest of 17-year-old Roderick Macrae. There is no question that Macrae committed this terrible act. What would lead such a shy and intelligent boy down this bloody path? Presented as a collection of documents, His Bloody Project opens with a series of police statements taken from the villagers, which offer conflicting impressions, throwing Macrae's motive and his sanity into question.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Much, Much Better than the Sample Suggests

  • By Alex on 18-11-16

Bloody good too

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-01-18

Very thought provoking on a number of levels. Sad and heartbreaking but also offers a glimmer of something better in form of the advocate and some other kind souls but ultimately futile in the face of intellectual and government idiocy, religion and other narratives of the time.