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Mr. O. Jollands

  • 7
  • reviews
  • 41
  • helpful votes
  • 31
  • ratings
  • Alan Partridge: Nomad

  • By: Alan Partridge
  • Narrated by: Alan Partridge
  • Length: 6 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,479
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 4,990
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,963

In Alan Partridge: Nomad, Alan dons his boots, windcheater and scarf and embarks on an odyssey through a place he once knew - it's called Britain - intent on completing a journey of immense personal significance. Diarising his ramble in the form of a 'journey journal', Alan details the people and places he encounters, ruminates on matters large and small and, on a final leg fraught with danger, becomes not a man (because he was one to start off with) but a better, more inspiring example of a man.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Every line has a joke.

  • By Dickie Armstrong on 24-10-16

Not a patch on I, Partridge

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-10-16

I was genuinely excited for this book having enjoyed I, Partridge immensely and being a fan of Steve Coogan's work . Unfortunately as much as I wanted to love it, it just doesn't live up to the anticipation.

There are a few classic Partridge moments scattered throughout the book and the narration is very good throughout as you'd expect but the actual text struggles to find its way and feels cobbled together. Disparate ideas have been patched up into a narrative without a clear need for the story.

This makes sense given how Alan himself comes up with the idea for the book within the book but unfortunately no level of meta meaning can compensate for a weak text.

I get the feeling that this would have made a good episode or 2 of the TV show with all of the body language and the different edit choices that would go into that kind of project but as a book it falls flat and although I got through it, it dragged quite a lot and I only genuinely laughed once.

9 of 13 people found this review helpful

  • Haven Lost

  • The Dragon's Brood Cycle, Book 1
  • By: Josh de Lioncourt
  • Narrated by: Reay Kaplan
  • Length: 16 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2

Sixteen-year-old Emily Haven, heroine of the girls' hockey team at Lindsey High, has spent her young life keeping two secrets: her rapidly deteriorating home life and the seemingly supernatural power that makes her a star on the ice. When she begins seeing visions of a lost and ragged boy reflected in mirrors and shop windows, a series of events unfolds that tears her from 21st-century Minneapolis and leaves her stranded in another world with horrors to rival those she has left behind.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A great first book

  • By Mr. O. Jollands on 12-09-16

A great first book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-09-16

Haven Lost is an entertaining and well thought out fantasy adventure novel. The narration is very good with some great voice acting and excellent interpretation of the text and although there is some dialogue that at times can feel jarring it is easily forgiven due to the wider context of the book and some of it's genuinely surprising plot twists.

I thoroughly enjoyed listening to the book and would recommend giving it a go. As far as I am aware this is Josh de Lioncourt's first book and it shows a lot of promise.

  • The Long Earth

  • By: Terry Pratchett, Stephen Baxter
  • Narrated by: Michael Fenton Stevens
  • Length: 11 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,976
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,641
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,645

The Western Front, 1916. Private Percy Blakeney wakes up. He is lying on fresh spring grass. He can hear birdsong, and the wind in the leaves in the trees. Where have the mud, blood, and blasted landscape of No Man's Land gone? Madison, Wisconsin, 2015. Cop Monica Jansson is exploring the burned-out home of a reclusive - some said mad, others dangerous - scientist when she finds a curious gadget: a box containing some wiring, a three-way switch and a potato. It is the prototype of a life-changing invention....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Engrossing.

  • By Martin on 10-03-13

Slow burn start but good once it got going

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-07-16

I was not sure about this book for the opening hour or so but I stuck with it and found that as it went on the story began to pull me in and I got used to the narrator.

It's a fairly slow start but an interesting concept with some good story points. There isn't much of a Terry Pratchett feel to this book and I've not read any Baxter before but I would guess that Baxters input forms the thrust of the narrative drive in this story given Pratchett's presence is normally very strongly felt on his projects.

A good story overall and I'll be following the series through to the next book but be prepared to struggle through the opening and don't go into it expecting Terry Pratchett's trade mark humour.

  • Welcome to Night Vale

  • A Novel
  • By: Joseph Fink, Jeffrey Cranor
  • Narrated by: Cecil Baldwin
  • Length: 12 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 430
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 404
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 401

Night Vale is a small desert town where all the conspiracy theories you've ever heard are actually true. It is here that the lives of two women, with two mysteries, will converge. Nineteen-year-old Night Vale pawn shop owner Jackie Fierro is given a paper marked 'KING CITY' by a mysterious man in a tan jacket. She can't seem to get the paper to leave her hand, and no one who meets this man can remember anything about him.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • For the fans really

  • By Beccameriel on 24-01-16

A huge dose of Night Vale life

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-12-15

If you're a long time listener of the Welcome to Night Vale podcast then you will love this book I'm sure. It has all of the trappings of the podcast and is a huge weird and wonderful addition to the Night Vale mythos.

If you're not already a fan of Welcome to Night Vale however, I have no idea how you might respond to this. I'd recommend checking out the podcast and listening to a few episodes up front. There's a lot of abstract and absurdest humour that really drives these stories and if that's not your thing this would be a potentially difficult and disappointing purchase for you.

Cecil's narration is flawless and he has put in an excellent performance throughout the book and I think that the writers have done an excellent job of taking the small dose format of the podcasts and extending that into a much more long form story with a few interspersals of familiar community radio action.

  • Flow

  • Living at the Peak of Your Abilities
  • By: Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi Ph.D.
  • Narrated by: Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi Ph.D.
  • Length: 5 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 403
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 343
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 339

In flow, everyday experience becomes a moment by moment opportunity for joy and self-fulfillment. Flow is the brain-child of a fascinating psychologist, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, a renowned social scientist who has devoted his life's work to the study of what makes people truly happy, satisfied and fulfilled. While much of the study of psychology investigates disorders of the human mind, Dr. Csikszentmihalyi takes a different route.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • This written book is excellent, this is not

  • By Amazon Customer on 28-06-15

Good information in a soup of chintz

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-04-15

Some of the information in this book is useful and the ideas have informed a lot of other peoples work so for that reason I would try another book by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi but I would research its audio quality better first.

This book actually seems to be a collected series of talks and the talks would appear to be fairly old with relatively poor quality audio recording. Think going back to VHS if you're used to DVD and it's about there.

The element that really does this book a disservice though is not so much the narration, as regardless of their voice I tend to enjoy the original author reading their own work, but that the audio quality has been accepted and that the production is flooded with awful chinzy music that wouldn't be amiss in a 1970's school video aimed at educating you about oxbow lake formation or something similar.

Personally I'd recommend checking out some more recent work that is formed off of some of the points raised in this work or getting the physical book to read unless you have a high tolerance to cut through some pretty awful audio production for some information that is in the modern context not overly unique.

13 of 13 people found this review helpful

  • Everyday Sexism

  • By: Laura Bates
  • Narrated by: Laura Bates, Sarah Brown
  • Length: 10 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 223
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 207
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 204

Women are standing up and #shoutingback. In a culture that's driven by social media, for the first time women are using this online space (@EverydaySexism www.everydaysexism.com) to come together, share their stories, and encourage a new generation to recognise the problems that women face. This book is a call to arms in a new wave of feminism and it proves sexism is endemic - socially, politically, and economically. But women won't stand for it.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I inhabit a world that I am oblivious to.

  • By Mr. O. Jollands on 03-12-14

I inhabit a world that I am oblivious to.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-12-14

What made the experience of listening to Everyday Sexism the most enjoyable?

Listening to Everyday Sexism is not enjoyable, but I feel that it is necessary. I thought that I was pretty well informed on the trials and tribulations of being a woman in the modern world but I now realise that I actually didn't have a clue. I've never had to take breaks from a book before due to the oppressive weight of the content, nor have I encountered an experience that was this unpleasant that I continued on with simply because I recognised the importance of hearing it.

What other book might you compare Everyday Sexism to, and why?

I've not read anything comparable.

Have you listened to any of Laura Bates and Sarah Brown ’s other performances? How does this one compare?

No.

19 of 20 people found this review helpful

  • Bad Pharma

  • How Drug Companies Mislead Doctors and Harm Patients
  • By: Ben Goldacre
  • Narrated by: Jot Davies
  • Length: 12 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 623
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 525
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 525

'Bad Science’ hilariously exposed the tricks that quacks and journalists use to distort science, becoming a 400,000 copy bestseller. Now Ben Goldacre puts the $600bn global pharmaceutical industry under the microscope. What he reveals is a fascinating, terrifying mess.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Every medical doctor should read this!

  • By Lut on 23-12-12

A clear & fascinating breakdown of complex issues.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-12-14

What did you like most about Bad Pharma?

The clear and no nonsense tackling of the subject matter makes Bad Pharma an easy to follow book that takes on some very complex ideas and issues. Ben's writing and the audio performance of it keeps the material fascinating and engaging throughout.

What other book might you compare Bad Pharma to, and why?

This book lifts the lid on an industry that spends a fortune on promoting an outward image of competence and trust worthiness and exposes some very real issues that go to the heart of many segments of the pharmaceutical industry.

In that respect I'd compare this to Felicity Lawrence's "Not on the Label" who does a similar job with the food industry.

Which scene did you most enjoy?

This isn't really a book of scene's so much as a progression through a narrative documentation of the problems with a system and the players within it. As such the whole book feels like a whole entity with no favourite scene to be taken out of context.