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  • The Selfish Gene

  • By: Richard Dawkins
  • Narrated by: Richard Dawkins, Lalla Ward
  • Length: 16 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,443
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,124
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,100

Richard Dawkins' brilliant reformulation of the theory of natural selection has the rare distinction of having provoked as much excitement and interest outside the scientific community as within it. His theories have helped change the whole nature of the study of social biology, and have forced thousands to rethink their beliefs about life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great listen

  • By Luke Barton on 20-08-11

Too irritating to finish

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-09-15

Have you ever had a meeting with a salesman who is on a day out with his manager and every few minutes the manager chips in with corrections and comments? After about 30 minutes you're ready to throw them both out of your office. That's what its like listening to this book. Dawkins' wife reads the original text which is interpolated by Dawkins himself with commentary and end notes.

The interruptions to the narrative are infuriating and I found myself grinding my teeth in anticipation of the next one. It doesn't help that Dawkins himself comes over as smug, superior and self-important.

I already shared Dawkins point of view before I started the book but found myself wishing that I didn't.

If you are going to add so much to your original work then you should re-write it.

One that may be better read than listened to.

18 of 23 people found this review helpful

  • Reading Poker Tells

  • By: Zachary Elwood
  • Narrated by: Zachary Elwood
  • Length: 3 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10

Reading Poker Tells is being called the best book about poker tells by many players, both amateur and professional. Besides cataloging the most common poker-related behavioral patterns, the book gives a mental framework for analyzing and remembering poker tells.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Compulsory for live NLH poker players

  • By AD on 18-04-14

Compulsory for live NLH poker players

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-04-14

As far as I can find (please tell me if I'm wrong) only Elwood and Caro have anything really practical to say about reading live poker tells. Elwood is more focussed on NL Holdem and is more up to date but most of what he says validates Caro principles. Real live poker players will scoff at some of the rubbish turned out by most so-called body language experts (ex-FBI agents in particular). Lying in poker is most definitely NOT the same as lying in real life. It is part of the game and the consequence of being caught out are more likely to be commiseration or guarded admiration than admonishment or prison. This makes a big difference to how a person behaves at the poker table vs real life.

This is a well structured book and Elwood uses real examples to demonstrate his points that clearly come from his experience as a professional poker player. Some of his comments in the appendices will ring true with a lot of live players that are not compulsive gamblers and play for the skill, stamina and concentration involved. Personally I try and avoid cash games for fear that I am taking money from weak individuals for whom gambling is an illness and poker a placebo. Its comforting to think that some pros feel the same way too.

Elwood also makes the point that there are no cast iron rules and this is not an easy checklist that will turn you into the Darren Brown of poker. It takes a lot of concentration and experience and noting behaviour patterns is hard when you are also thinking about your own strategy/table image as well as hand-ranges and percentages.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Alex Ferguson

  • My Autobiography
  • By: Alex Ferguson
  • Narrated by: James Macpherson, Alex Ferguson
  • Length: 9 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,698
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,538
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,535

Revised and updated with new material from the paperback edition. Includes a prelude read by Sir Alex Ferguson. Sir Alex Ferguson's compelling story is always honest and revealing he reflects on his managerial career that embraced unprecedented European success for Aberdeen and 26 triumphant seasons with Manchester United.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Honest and simple

  • By R. Kitzinger on 30-05-14

Struggled to finish it

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-01-14

If you admire Alex Ferguson but instinctively find him hard to like then this book will probably do nothing to change your mind. Ferguson chronicles of all the things he has contributed to the beautiful game and takes credit for a few tenuous achievements besides. The book demonstrates his acute understanding of football but lacks any humour or humility. Furthermore he gracelessly and needlessly sticks the knife into anyone who has crossed his path over the years. The only time I laughed was when the narrator (who was chosen I assume because he sounds just like Sir Alex) broke into impressions of other people - something you could never imagine Ferguson doing.

It took me weeks to finish because the more more I read of it the less I liked him.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Cuckoo's Calling

  • Cormoran Strike, Book 1
  • By: Robert Galbraith
  • Narrated by: Robert Glenister
  • Length: 15 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,707
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,883
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,860

When a troubled model falls to her death from a snow-covered Mayfair balcony, it is assumed that she has committed suicide. However, her brother has his doubts, and calls in private investigator Cormoran Strike to look into the case.Strike is a war veteran - wounded both physically and psychologically - and his life is in disarray. The case gives him a financial lifeline, but it comes at a personal cost: the more he delves into the young model's complex world, the darker things get - and the closer he gets to terrible danger...

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Entertaining and likeable

  • By Dragon on 06-05-13

Cliches done well

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-11-13

You can imagine the thought process "Well I've done this Potter thing to death, let's try something completely different. How about a curmudgeonly, ex-forces, private detective (oh and let's give him only one leg and call him Cameron Strike), down on his luck with hardly any work when a wealthy punter turns up and twists his arm to solve a 'murder' that the police have given up on? Let's then contrive the plot so that the least likely person to have dunnit, actually dunnit.

There is nothing at all new in this book but apart from wincing at some of the tired old stereotypes it is a really good read.

This may be construed as a sexist comment but if you didn't know JK was writing under a pseudonym a clue to the gender of the writer was Strike watching a premiership match on TV at 3pm on a Saturday. Anyone with the slightest interest in football would know that this has never happened.

Still really enjoyed it and Glenister's narration was great.

  • What Every BODY Is Saying

  • An Ex-FBI Agent’s Guide to Speed-Reading People
  • By: Joe Navarro, Marvin Karlins
  • Narrated by: Paul Costanzo
  • Length: 7 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 528
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 370
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 364

Listen to this book and send your nonverbal intelligence soaring. Joe Navarro, a former FBI counterintelligence officer and a recognized expert on nonverbal behavior, explains how to "speed-read" people: decode sentiments and behaviors, avoid hidden pitfalls, and look for deceptive behaviors. You'll also learn how your body language can influence what your boss, family, friends, and strangers think of you.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent

  • By Alistair on 16-06-12

Generally disappointing but with a few insights

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-05-13

Unless you are a little slow and need to be told things several times supported by obvious and cliched anecdotes then just read the accompanying .pdf and forget the audio.

I bought this for poker tells and most of the behaviours I could already recognise. A few little gems around pacifying behaviours but not worth the hours invested in listening to all of it.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Decide to Play Great Poker

  • A Strategy Guide to No-limit Texas Hold Em
  • By: Annie Duke, John Vorhaus
  • Narrated by: Annie Duke
  • Length: 10 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19

Ask the great poker players how they'd play a hand and the answer is always "it depends." That answer can be infuriating. But guess what? It really does depend. The key to becoming a great poker player is in knowing what it depends on. At last there's a book that gives you that answer. Poker is a game of so many variables; table position, flop texture, the number of players in a hand, the personalities of your opponents, and so much more.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Useful Resource - could have been better executed

  • By Gregory on 19-10-18

Surprise! One of the best poker books I have read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-05-13

I have been playing poker live and online for a few years and I have read all the basics (Harrington, Gordon, Sklansky). I want to improve, stop making mistakes and better understand the game. I have been looking for more contemporary books that acknowledge the way the game has changed, are not just retrofit strategy or ego trips and move on from the basics e.g. Gordon Gold which I recommend if you want to get ranges. This book is everything Duhamel's book is not, intelligent, practical, unemotional, well reasoned and well structured. It has already helped my game although Ms Duke is right that some of the techniques feel a little odd at times and you often want to revert to your old game - resist! For those tennis players it is like a coach trying to change your serve from something that usually gets the ball in but doesn't win many points, to a real weapon that wins you games. As soon as the coach isn't there you slip back into old ways, especially when under pressure. Use the practice drills at the end of the book and stick at it.

As a Brit, Ms Duke's voice and style are a little irritating at first but get through that and you will start to enjoy the conversational approach and occasional suspect language.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful