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  • 121
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  • 144
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  • Funhouse

  • Sixteen Tales of Madness, Murder, Terror & Insanity
  • By: Michael Bray
  • Narrated by: David Mellon
  • Length: 8 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 7
  • Performance
    2.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 6

A man who makes an unscheduled stop gets more than he bargained for in "Candyland". A group of teens discover a terrible secret on Samsonite farm in "Scarecrows". A schoolyard bully and his former victim reunite with horrifying results in "Long Tall Coffin." A high school party becomes an arachnid nightmare for one unfortunate guest in "The Boy Who Saw Spiders". These are just some of the horrors hidden within the darkest recesses of the funhouse.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • CRAP NARRAT0R MADE ME GIVE UP!

  • By Sue Jackson on 03-10-15

To think this kind of drivel actually gets published

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-06-18

Actually the ideas are sound enough though not original at all. The writing is poor and the reading not good either. This might be anything but really it’s just plain awful and to think this kind of drivel actually gets published and people like me, unsuspecting as we are looking for a good scary story read it or have it read to us. Well so who’s the fool? Not sure about that but I would not recommend this to anyone.

  • Already Dead

  • By: Jaye Ford
  • Narrated by: Sarah Blackstone
  • Length: 13 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 11
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 9

On a Monday afternoon as Miranda Jack waits at traffic lights, a stranger jumps into her car and points a gun at her chest. Forced to drive at high speed up the motorway, Miranda listens to the man’s frantic, paranoid rants, claiming he's being chased and that they're both now running for their lives. Two hours later, Miranda is safe but she can't simply walk away - not without knowing the truth about that terrifying drive....

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Is it only cats that di3 of curiosity?

  • By Rose on 04-06-18

Is it only cats that di3 of curiosity?

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-06-18

I really wanted to give this book five stars but there are holes in it and quite a bit of repitition such as lip rolling and slight smiles all through the book. So then I wanted ti give it four stars but the ending? Corny at best awful at worst. Taht apart and that said it’s not a bad book for most of the way. it has pace and plot, it is read well. Miranda Jack is probably the most unpleasant irritating character in it and yet you can see her point in most respects but she does go on but then she’s a journo and they tend to go on a bit. It’s about the psychology and obsession of a journalist to know more about her husband’s death and then suddenly it’s all happening again. The trouble is the original crime is still the one she finds out nothing about or if she does the book ends before we’re told about it. I’d recommend it though to anyone that likes a good pacey psychological drama and it’s also a thriller. I sound as if i didn’t enjoy this book but mostly I did actually.

  • Mossad

  • The Greatest Missions of the Israeli Secret Service
  • By: Michael Bar-Zohar, Nissim Mishal
  • Narrated by: Benjamin Isaac
  • Length: 14 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 122
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 108
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 107

In Mossad, authors MichaelBar-Zohar and Nissim Mishal take us behind the closed curtain with riveting, eye-opening, boots-on-the-ground accounts of the most dangerous, most crucial missions in the agency's 60-year history.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Enthralling

  • By stu on 20-12-14

The world will be a dangerous place as long as children are in charge

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-05-18

Well, I like this book but really reading it leaves one wondering whether human beings really do grow up or do they just grow older? Secrets, spying and hiding in plain sight are the underlying themes of this book. Adults acting like children but the stakes are higher. ‘I’ve got a secret and I’m not telling’ seems to be what’s at bottom of this book only we’re not dealing with a bunch of silly girls here but real people and real situations. War is necessary but not good and the over-reactionary ways of government are similar to the mass panic we still see today. How can we learn any lessons while we behave in this manner? That’s my impression of this book which tells the history of the Mosad and its fanatical crusade against those that harmed it in other words the Jews agains the Nazis and others so taht it’s like games withoutout frontiers for the most part with real lives in the balance. Children children. The naration could be better but the book is one of those that details just how adult our child leaders truly are and the lengths they’ll go to, to prove it and their recruits as well.

  • AWOL on the Appalachian Trail

  • By: David Miller
  • Narrated by: Christopher Lane
  • Length: 10 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 60
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 57
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 56

In 2003, software engineer David Miller left his job, family, and friends to hike 2,172 miles of the Appalachian Trail. AWOL on the Appalachian Trail is Miller’s account of this thru-hike from Georgia to Maine. Listeners are treated to rich descriptions of the Appalachian Mountains, the isolation and reverie, the inspiration that fueled his quest, and the rewards of taking a less conventional path through life. While this book abounds with introspection and perseverance, it also provides useful passages about hiking gear and planning.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • excellent story, easy to listen to.

  • By Anonymous User on 10-05-17

Well, it was short I guess.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-04-18

I always like to be fair when I review a book and in this case I hope to do the same though some people reading this might think me entirely unfair since it’s one of those books you’ll either find interesting or you’ll dislike for its lack of detail. That it does lack detail is apparent from the first. This book differs from the possibly more famous ‘a walk in the woods’ by bill Bryson in two respects. For one thing this is a solo walk by and large with no enlivening facts to be tossed in now and then, small observations about conservation and some history and it doesn’t whine all the time about everything and nothing. Also unlike the Bryson book it actually does complete the whole trail rather than growing bored with it halfway through or less. The book is a whistle stop tour guide which some might find lacking in something fundamental. I liked it though because it does not contain any of those boring and annoying details that characterize so many travelogue books when the family come to visit. it rather glosses over that side of things and sticks with the story maintaining focus all the way through. there are very few ego commetns such as praise from readers of Miller’s journal and very few references to modern things which makes the book refreshing for me. The reason I gave it four stars only is because there is so little detail about events taht took place in the past on the trail. The narator too kind of spoils it a bit sounding either tired or bored I can’t make up my mind which. Some might call it soporific but for me, I found it tiresome. There’s inflection there but somehow, I felt the narator couldn’t really generate any interest in this book. I hope this has been a helpful review.

  • Amy Snow

  • By: Tracy Rees
  • Narrated by: Melody Grove
  • Length: 15 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 721
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 661
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 666

Winner of the 2014 Richard & Judy Search for a Bestseller competition. Abandoned on a bank of snow as a baby, Amy is taken in at nearby Hatville Court. But the masters and servants of the grand estate prove cold and unwelcoming. Amy's only friend and ally is the sparkling young heiress Aurelia Vennaway. So when Aurelia tragically dies young, Amy is devastated. But Aurelia leaves Amy one last gift. A bundle of letters with a coded key. A treasure hunt that only Amy can follow. A life-changing discovery awaits ... if only she can unlock the secret.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Loved this book

  • By Hungrychics on 21-10-15

There once was an ugly duckling

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-04-18

Well, this is a typical historical romance, in fact it’s a typical romance altogether in my experience of romances which I actually do not like and don’t read all that often. This one though is intriguing if the language is not quite right for the time period it is set in. A typical ugly duckling coming out of her shell kind of book and finding herself a swan. To take the analogy further Amy Snow is a catarpillar which becomes a butterfly flitting and flying from one destination to another in search of riches. It’s predictable in places and to be honest Amy is a real ditherer unable to put two and two together which is kind of annoying since we know what’s going on while she pretends not to. Are heroines really that dim? Apparently yes they are. The naration is breathy in places though well enough read. there’s at least no repetition or very little of words and phrases which is good. The plot is not exactly original and bears a more than passing resemblance to Jane Eyre. the clues centre around Charles Dickens and his early work but it’s not too bad. Any reader of romances as a rule will thoroughly enjoy this I think.

  • The American Boy

  • By: Andrew Taylor
  • Narrated by: Alex Jennings
  • Length: 16 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 155
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 94
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 93

England, 1819. Two enigmatic Americans arrive in London and soon after, a bank collapses. A man is found dead on a building site; another goes missing in the teeming stews of Seven Dials. A deathbed vigil ends in an act of theft and a beautiful heiress flirts with her inferiors. A strange destiny links each of these events to the American boy Edgar Allen Poe, brought to England by his foster father and sent to the leafy village of Stoke Newington to be educated.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An absolute must

  • By The Fool on 23-04-06

Plot just about saves this from being utterly boring.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-04-18

Were it not for the immense amount of plot lines this book would be just about the most boring piece of drivel I have read in a long old time. Unfortunately the author though he uses flowery regency prose still manages to fail to use the whole of the linguistic toolbox at his disposal and so the book has a propensity to being repetitive and therefore of no real interest. However, it is a literary and historical novel very much in the style of George Elliot which is its only saviour, that and the fact that, american accents apart it is well read and intriguing. Taht’s about all I have to way about it.

  • Black Diamonds

  • The Rise and Fall of an English Dynasty
  • By: Catherine Bailey
  • Narrated by: Gareth Armstrong
  • Length: 15 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 602
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 405
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 404

Wentworth is today a crumbling and forgotten palace in Yorkshire. Yet just 100 years ago it was the ancestral pile of the Fitzwilliams' - an aristocratic clan whose home and life were fuelled by coal mining. This is the story of their spectacular decline: of inheritance fights; rumours of a changeling and of lunacy; philandering earls; illicit love; war heroism: a tragic connection to the Kennedys'; violent deaths: mining poverty and squalor; and a class war that literally ripped apart the local landscape.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant!

  • By Colin on 19-02-09

Truly this is simply awful

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-04-18

Well I’m sorry to say I really cannot stand this book. I’ve berely read any of it and already I am irritated by the amount of frankly boring detail and the journalistic style of writing. So many ‘remembered’ or ‘remembers’ and ‘recalls’ is just tedious in the extreme. I can’t say anything good about it and yet the sample led me to believe this book would be great. I only hope I’m not too late to return it and the other book i ahve by this person I hesitate and can’t bring myself to call ehr an author or a writer, I just can’t bring myself to lie. It’s truly that awful. An interesting subject dried out with detail.

  • Three Daughters

  • A Novel
  • By: Consuelo Saah Baehr
  • Narrated by: Karen Peakes
  • Length: 23 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 335
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 312
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 311

Born in rural Palestine, just before the dawn of the 20th century, Miriam adores her father and is certain his love will protect her, but she soon finds that tradition overrides love. Uprooted by war, Miriam enters a world where the old constraints slip away with thrilling and disastrous results. Miriam's rebellious daughter, Nadia, is thrilled with the opportunity for a modern life that her elite education provides. But when she falls in love with an outsider, the clan reins her back with a shocking finality.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent Narration

  • By Marytee on 30-08-16

What a pile of gushing drivel in the main

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-03-18

This book, for the most part is just a pile of predictable gushing sentimental drivel. That’s my honest opinion of this particular work. it’s only saving grace is the history of Pallestine against which this historical romance is set. taht part is the only reason i took this book in the first place. For the rest it’s just awful but then I cannot stand romances which this is. Everything about it is totally predictable right down to the stolen daughter and well, god bless America which is enough to make most people living outside the States just want to throw up but there’s plenty of it in this book and, though i haven’t finished it yet I can guess it’ll end that way. The performance now, well, it’s well enough read as far as it goes but the accents are just plain awful. The Scottixh accent is particuarly bad and the English one isn’t a great deal better. So, if you love romances this will suit you but if you don’t well, I’m sure there are better books than this which will give you all the history you want.

  • MEMBER GIFT: The Tales of Max Carrados

  • By: Ernest Bramah
  • Narrated by: Stephen Fry
  • Length: 1 hr and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 2,318
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,104
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 2,108

Max Carrados, a fictional detective series, was first introduced to the literary world by Ernest Bramah in 1914. In the Edwardian era, Carrados' stories often outsold Sherlock Holmes, with the blind detective sharing top billing with his fictional rival. George Orwell wrote that together with those of Conan Doyle, they were "the only detective stories since Poe that are worth rereading".

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant

  • By Lena on 17-12-15

Fun I suppose but wholely implausible

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-03-18

I’ll keep this brief. Sime might find this a total insult. A blind man doing all that? As one afflicted by the same I can categorically assure anyone that what Max is supposed to have been capable of is entirely implausible but as a comedy it’s fine. Well narated as you’d expect but not one to be taken too seriously. No wonder audible gave the thing away. I doubt anyone would buy it but for the naration anyway.

  • Spine Chillers

  • By: M. R. James
  • Narrated by: Derek Jacobi
  • Length: 1 hr and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 21
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14

A compilation of five chilling stories from M.R. James, including four previously unreleased stories and originally recorded for the Radio 4 Woman's Hour in Christmas 2007. MR James is an important part of the nation's celebration of Christmas. In the oral tradition, many of his 30 or so tales were penned as Christmas Eve entertainments and read aloud to gatherings of friends.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Don’t listen aloone especially on a dark wet night

  • By Rose on 22-03-18

Don’t listen aloone especially on a dark wet night

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-03-18

An excellent dramatization of some of the best M. R. James short ghost stories ever written. It’s interesting to learn how many times the author used a dream sequence in his stories but these are short plays recorded by actors. It might have been nice to know who the other voices were and who composed the music which really does enhance the dialogue. The acting is pretty much superb though occasionally it is less so and the best of it is each play is short so it’s great as inserts to the main event if there is one during the festival of Halloween but don’t listen alone or if you do you might prefer to sleep the night through with the light on that is always assuming you sleep at all after listening to this.