Jack Tanner
Books in series2
UNABRIDGED
(4.5 based on 79 ratings)
  • 1
    The Odin Mission: Jack Tanner, Book 1 | James Holland

    The Odin Mission: Jack Tanner, Book 1

    • UNABRIDGED (12 hrs and 56 mins)
    • By James Holland
    • Narrated By Saul Reichlin
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (41)
    Performance
    (39)
    Story
    (39)

    April 1940: Nazi Germany has invaded neutral Norway. Fleeing north from their brutal blitzkrieg advance are three officers of the King's Guard - men who have been entrusted by the Norwegian King with a vitally important mission. The only military force which stands between the Nazi forces and total victory are the poorly equipped, undertrained squaddies of the British 148th Brigade. Among them is Sergeant Jack Tanner, recently returned from the Middle East. As the British are pushed back from Lillehammer, Sergeant Tanner and his patrol are left stranded in the mountains in the chaos of retreat.

    A job well done

    You can almost be there with them, hungry and cold but determined to finish the job.

    Reviewed on 13 July 2016 by Lance (Canterbury, United Kingdom)
  • 2
    Darkest Hour: Jack Tanner, Book 2 | James Holland

    Darkest Hour: Jack Tanner, Book 2

    • UNABRIDGED (16 hrs and 22 mins)
    • By James Holland
    • Narrated By Gordon Griffin
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (38)
    Performance
    (32)
    Story
    (33)

    May 1940: Sergeant Jack Tanner has been posted to a training company on the southeast coast of England where the mysterious deaths of two Polish refugees lead him to believe there has been foul play. As the Germans launch their blitzkrieg in Europe, the entire company are sent to join the battle to stop Hitler's drive across the Low Countries. Pitted against the die-hard Nazis of the SS "Death's Head" division and the great panzer commander, General Rommel himself, it is left to Tanner to get his men back to Allied lines.

    Bang for Buck

    This is great stuff, extremely well researched and believable with exquisite detail but it never glorifies war it far too realistic.

    Reviewed on 23 March 2016 by L. Hayes (England)