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Why Information Grows Audiobook

Why Information Grows: The Evolution of Order, from Atoms to Economies

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Publisher's Summary

What is economic growth? And why, historically, has it occurred in only a few places? Previous efforts to answer these questions have focused on institutions, geography, finances, and psychology. But according to MIT's anti-disciplinarian César Hidalgo, understanding the nature of economic growth demands transcending the social sciences and including the natural sciences of information, networks, and complexity. To understand the growth of economies, Hidalgo argues, we first need to understand the growth of order.

At first glance, the universe seems hostile to order. Thermodynamics dictates that over time, order - or information - disappears. Whispers vanish in the wind just like the beauty of swirling cigarette smoke collapses into disorderly clouds. But thermodynamics also has loopholes that promote the growth of information in pockets. Although cities are all pockets where information grows, they are not all the same. For every Silicon Valley, Tokyo, and Paris, there are dozens of places with economies that accomplish little more than pulling rocks out of the ground. So, why does the US economy outstrip Brazil's, and Brazil's that of Chad? Why did the technology corridor along Boston's Route 128 languish, while Silicon Valley blossomed? In each case, the key is how people, firms, and the networks they form make use of information.

Seen from Hidalgo's vantage, economies become distributed computers, made of networks of people, and the problem of economic development becomes the problem of making these computers more powerful. By uncovering the mechanisms that enable the growth of information in nature and society, Why Information Grows lays bare the origins of physical order and economic growth. Situated at the nexus of information theory, physics, sociology, and economics, this book propounds a new theory of how economies can do not just more things, but more interesting things.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying reference material will be available in your My Library section along with the audio.

©2015 César Hidalgo (P)2016 Audible, Inc.

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  • bpjammin
    Hawaii
    07/01/17
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Great book!"

    This may be the most eloquently written science book I’ve ever read and one that manages to make extremely complicated information easier to comprehend. It is certainly comparable to Feynman’s Lectures, in terms of reducing the complex to simpler subsets for the novice, which Hidalgo manages to do without use of complex mathematics.

    During the past year I have listened to/read dozens of science books concerning genetics, microbiology, evolutionary biology, evolutionary theory, cognitive & evolutionary neuroscience and one of the things I noticed was that all this evolution violates the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics and that certain aspects of evolution can't be explained by Darwinian theory, leading some to speculate about "design," however, I stumbled upon this book on information theory and it resolves most of the problems aforementioned without resorting to design.

    Also, without ever referencing McLuhan, this book elucidates many of McLuhan’s aphorisms: like The Media (transmission of content) is The Message (content has no intrinsic meaning,) and McLuhan’s assertion that technologies are evolutionary extensions (wheel extends foot, phone extends voice…) are also supported by information theory as presented here.

    What surprised me most was the lack of any reference to Information Theory in any of the books I have read concerning the physical sciences. How can Evolutionary Theory have missed such a big data set necessary to extend its own theories? It’s a glaring omission from the works I’ve read thus far.

    Great book!

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Adam Kahn
    03/10/16
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    Story
    "Fantastic lense to see the world"

    This was a strong case for how to view the world and how the leading indicator of economic prosperity is told in the complexity of organization of information

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • T. Leach
    Washington, DC
    15/09/16
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    Performance
    Story
    "Great book! The breath of the framework"

    Is astonishingly beautiful. It will be hard for anyone who reads and understand this work to look at the world the same. I have been fascinated with information theory, biology, and physics for years. The author brings them all together in an accessible way. Breathtaking work!

    5 of 6 people found this review helpful
  • Nigel
    Tauranga, New Zealand
    06/10/16
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    Performance
    Story
    "Powerful synthesis that explains how information wins out over entropy"

    I highly recommend investing the time to listen to this amazing synthesis. It ties together the things that matter about how systems organise in diverse realms. I would have given it five stars had it not been for the rather labyrinthine prose that made listening rather hard work. Submitted via a visit to the Hemingway app, it would have been even more compelling.

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Spencer
    01/01/17
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    Performance
    Story
    "Very direct explanation of economies"

    To oversimplify a fair bit , the author explain in more detail and using a lot more physics what Hayek try to outline in his influential 1945 paper the use of knowledge in society. the only way I can sort of describe this book is it is a cross between Thomas Sowell's book "Knowledge and Decisions" and Matt Ridley's book "The Evolution of Everything" with a bunch of complexity theory mixed in.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Mark Augustini
    PLANO, TEXAS, US
    19/09/16
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    Performance
    Story
    "a delightful journey"

    Listened twice:) A great book with a wide and though provoking historical perspective that packs a punch !

    2 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • feller34
    01/12/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "spinning in circles"

    This book was tough to get through in fragments. Poyentially better as a straight read but it just felt like spinning in a circle to me.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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