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Eaarth Audiobook

Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet

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Publisher's Summary

Twenty years ago, with The End of Nature, Bill McKibben offered one of the earliest warnings about global warming. Those warnings went mostly unheeded; now, he insists, we need to acknowledge that we've waited too long and that massive change is not only unavoidable but already under way. Our old familiar globe is suddenly melting, drying, acidifying, flooding, and burning in ways that no human has ever seen. We've created, in very short order, a new planet, still recognizable but fundamentally different. We may as well call it Eaarth.

That new planet is filled with new binds and traps. A changing world costs large sums to defend-think of the money that went to repair New Orleans, or the trillions it will take to transform our energy systems. But the endless economic growth that could underwrite such largesse depends on the stable planet we've managed to damage and degrade. We can't rely on old habits any longer. Our hope depends, McKibben argues, on scaling back-on building the kind of societies and economies that can hunker down, concentrate on essentials, and create the type of community (in the neighborhood, but also on the Internet) that will allow us to weather trouble on an unprecedented scale. Change-fundamental change-is our best hope on a planet suddenly and violently out of balance.

©2010 Bill McKibben (P)2010 Macmillan Audio

What the Critics Say

"Read it, please. Straight through to the end. Whatever else you were planning to do next, nothing could be more important." (Barbara Kingsolver)

"What distinguishes McKibben as an environmental writer beyond his literary finesse and firm grasp of the complexities of science and society is his generous pragmatism, informed vision of small-scale solutions to our food and energy needs, and belief that Eaarth will remain a nurturing planet if we face facts, jettison destructive habits, and pursue new ways of living with creativity and conscience." (Booklist)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.7 (14 )
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5.0 (3 )
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4.7 (3 )
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Performance
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  •  
    Ms DUNDEE, United Kingdom 04/12/2012
    Ms DUNDEE, United Kingdom 04/12/2012 Member Since 2012
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    Overall
    "Empowering"

    McKibben sets out is argument in a logical and rational way, giving insight and clarity to complex issues, depressing at times (naturally!) but empowering all the same. Following on from his Deep Economy work, this book offers glimpses of how we might change our behaviour as the world around us shifts. It's impossible to walk in a wood after absorbing these words and not feel a different sensitivity to the other species we live amongst.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Cat Piggott Sussex, UK 30/03/2016
    Cat Piggott Sussex, UK 30/03/2016 Member Since 2014
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    28
    5
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    Story
    "Excellent. Everyone needs to read this."

    This book gives me hope. Hope that what we have worked so hard to destroy in the last hundred years is retrievable. Maybe not in any form we now recognise, but it is possible!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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  • Ira
    Indianapolis, IN, United States
    19/07/10
    Overall
    "A very important and interesting read"

    This is a must read for anyone and everyone that lives on this little rock that we call Earth. It is well researched, and for me has opened up my thinking to a few practical yet very important facts concerning our carbon problems. One idea that I was not aware of is the importants of localisation when it came to food production and energy. The author makes it clear that much harm has been already done to our Earth. This is why he refers to this small rock in space as Eaarth. What he does is not ring his hands, but show what can be done on Eaarth as it is today. Much can be done! All should read this book.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • David
    Forney, TX, United States
    10/02/11
    Overall
    "You'll get by with a lot of help from your friends"

    Bill McKibben seems to be convinced that catastrophic global warming is coming, there's nothing you can do about it, so you better start getting self-sufficient. After getting the number of 350 ppm of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere as the upper safe limit from climate science expert James Hansen, he tells us we are past that now and have no realistic chance of getting back to it.

    The first part of the book is a collection of the ways Earth has changed because of the global warming that has already occurred. He chose the title Eaarth to make a statement that we aren't living on the Earth we think we know, but a different planet "Eaarth." These changes are quite stunning all laid out one after another.

    The second half of the book is very muddled -- as though he couldn't decide what to say about how to fix it. Maybe he knows we can't. He quickly waves off nuclear power and I don't recall a mention of geoengineering at all. Instead, he talks about how great his Vermont farmers market co-op is. The second half is odd -- as though he has decided we're all screwed and need to find small communities to survive with, but doesn't have the heart to come right out and say it.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Michael Givental
    Chicago, IL United States
    27/07/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Audio version"

    The chapters on the audio version are not in chronological order or labeled. Don't buy it. The content however is fantastic and highly recommended as long as it's not the audio book version

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Benny S
    Madison, WI United States
    12/08/10
    Overall
    "Had high hopes, disappointed"

    Having heard a few interviews with McKibben I had high hopes for this book. Unfortunately I was pretty disappointed with it. I felt it did not actually discuss the topic of how we could live in the future much, and mostly discussed current and past problems. Also, it was very badly organized - bouncing around from one idea to the next with no real structure. I really don't recommend it.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Montaque
    15/07/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Interesting and different nuanced approach"

    Great narrator. loved the way Bill talks about climate change! I recommend this book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Jessica
    26/02/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Pretty good"

    This Changes Everything is better though. I feel like someone with a less chipper, more ominous voice should have read this, lol.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • A Regular Customer
    10/08/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "First Half Great, Second Half Not so Much"
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    The first half of this book is a crisp, yet thorough synopsis of the state of the new reality of the world in the age of climate change. It's upsetting, necessary and exciting to listen to. It makes you feel fully awake to what's really going on. It feels like a solid look at the future. Very useful.

    Then the second half wanders aimlessly. There is a lot of time spent on minute details of early American history. Not sure why. I couldn't figure out how it was connected to the book. I think it's about the concept that small communities are good. But, wow, it took a lot of time and effort to figure that out.

    Get the book for the first half. It's worth the full cost. The second half is still worth skimming through. But keep your expectations low or else you will be disappointed.


    How would you have changed the story to make it more enjoyable?

    The second half needs a lot of editing to be focused, and it could be far shorter.


    What about Oliver Wyman’s performance did you like?

    It's ok.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    The first half is very moving.


    Any additional comments?

    Needs to be released as an abridged version with second half carefully edited.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Ryan
    Tempe, AZ, United States
    18/03/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Great book, narration not so much..."
    Where does Eaarth rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    This is an excellently written book but the narration leaves a lot to be desired.


    Would you listen to another book narrated by Oliver Wyman?

    Probably not. Whenever someone was being quoted, he tried to mimic (very poorly) the voice of the person. Since this is a book that has many quotes from other people, it really detracted from the delivery. Also, whenever the phrase "in this book" came up, he always said "in this audio program" which I found very annoying.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Wade
    Fort Collins, CO, United States
    24/03/13
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "More of a downer than it needs to be"
    Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

    I am very concerned with climate change, and gave this a listen in hopes of learning something new. The idea that methane and CO2 can be released from warming bogs was new to me, so I learned something.


    What was your reaction to the ending? (No spoilers please!)

    I wish there was more data to backup general gloom of the book.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • DOYLE
    KENMORE, NY, United States
    18/09/11
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Pluses and Minuses"

    This book is extremely well researched and written, but may get dry at some points. The first half of the book is why we should be concerned--for those who already know or are already convinced, this may be tedious. Otherwise, a good compilation.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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