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Rubicon: The Triumph and Tragedy of the Roman Republic | [Tom Holland]

Rubicon: The Triumph and Tragedy of the Roman Republic

The Roman Republic was the most remarkable state in history. What began as a small community of peasants camped among marshes and hills ended up ruling the known world. Rubicon paints a vivid portrait of the Republic at the climax of its greatness - the same greatness which would herald the catastrophe of its fall. It is a story of incomparable drama.
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Publisher's Summary

The Roman Republic was the most remarkable state in history. What began as a small community of peasants camped among marshes and hills ended up ruling the known world. Rubicon paints a vivid portrait of the Republic at the climax of its greatness - the same greatness which would herald the catastrophe of its fall. It is a story of incomparable drama.

This was the century of Julius Caesar, the gambler whose addiction to glory led him to the banks of the Rubicon, and beyond; of Cicero, whose defence of freedom would make him a byword for eloquence; of Spartacus, the slave who dared to challenge a superpower; of Cleopatra, the queen who did the same. Tom Holland brings to life this strange and unsettling civilization, with its extremes of ambition and self-sacrifice, bloodshed and desire. Yet alien as it was, the Republic still holds up a mirror to us. Its citizens were obsessed by celebrity chefs, all-night dancing and exotic pets; they fought elections in law courts and were addicted to spin; they toppled foreign tyrants in the name of self-defence. Two thousand years may have passed, but we remain the Romans' heirs.

©2003 Tom Holland (P)2005 Recorded Books LLC

What Members Say

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  •  
    Dave stevenage, United Kingdom 29/04/2012
    Dave stevenage, United Kingdom 29/04/2012 Member Since 2010
    HELPFUL VOTES
    41
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    "Bad Romans make great listening"

    This is essentially a political history of the last century or so of the Roman Republic, ranging from the exploits of Sulla to the rise to the top of Augustus, the first true emperor of Rome. 'Rubicon' is as evocative a title as any, but while Caesar figures prominently of course, it is not primarily about his fateful move in 49 BCE nor about his life and death in general. Instead it is a guide through the roller-coaster journey of Roman politics in the last century BCE, and on the whole it shows Roman politicians as unscrupulous, power-hungry and generally prepared to do anything to achieve their personal aims.

    It's a cracking story and it is well told, putting into perspective events that most people will have heard of, like Caesar's 'invasions' of Britain and his later murder. The text moves along nicely, and it is very well read. Major events like wars with 'barbarians' and the Spartacus Slave Revolt are only touched on, and then only when they had an effect on the power politics of the day. Still it is an enjoyable eye-opener into how the Republic's politics worked, and if nothing else it makes even our own disreputable politicians look practically saint-like by comparison.

    9 of 9 people found this review helpful
  •  
    A Manning 22/11/2013
    A Manning 22/11/2013
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "a riveting story"
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    I'd recommend this- the story and narration make this exciting to listen to, rather than becoming a dry, detailed lesson on history.


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Zenouf the Birdcatcher 28/07/2014 Member Since 2012
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "A remarkable achievement."
    What made the experience of listening to Rubicon the most enjoyable?

    I enjoy reading the book whilst listening to the audible which I find an all enveloping experience.


    What did you like best about this story?

    It is a story that I know so well but one that is often poorly told. Tom Holland tells the tale as if it were a novel, perhaps as Robert Graves might have told it.


    What does Steven Crossley bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

    A wonderfully calm and relaxing voice.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    I am always surprised that the Roman Republic lasted as long as it did!


    Any additional comments?

    The demise of the Roman Republic is a study in the exercise of Power. In all antiquity this period is probably the best documented but that requires caution in the interpretation. Holland is a master of his subject and he leaves us with one of the best accounts I have read on the subject. I cannot recommend this book too highly to anyone interested in classical history.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Olivier thouare sur loire, France 23/01/2013
    Olivier thouare sur loire, France 23/01/2013 Member Since 2013
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    "Gripping from beginning to end"

    A gripping re-tell of the history of the last 100 years of the Roman Republic. Just enough detail and well-read.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Simon Exeter, United Kingdom 21/02/2015
    Simon Exeter, United Kingdom 21/02/2015 Member Since 2009
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Interesting - but irritating..."

    The book is full of factual and narrative interest, but is also packed with bad writing. "Slippery slope", "howls of outrage", "icy logic", "harsh reality" and so on - if Holland can express something in a cliche he will.
    The narrator's tone is slightly irritating (a sort of commercial-voiceover feel) and too often he stresses the wrong word in a long phrase so the meaning is not conveyed. Plus, hearing an Englishman pronounce "lootenant" and "forMIDable" and "FRUStrating" is faintly irksome.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Golden Sunflower 28/01/2015
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    2
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Fascinating, with Lovely Narration"
    What made the experience of listening to Rubicon the most enjoyable?

    The subject was fascinating, made the information accessible with lots of interesting detail/


    What was one of the most memorable moments of Rubicon?

    The futility of it all, and the greed of the emporers and people in power


    Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    It was fabulous to read about such a fundamental piece of the history of democracy, but to see that PEOPLE dont change at all


    Any additional comments?

    Narration was really great.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    George 27/12/2014
    George 27/12/2014
    HELPFUL VOTES
    4
    ratings
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    59
    12
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    Performance
    Story
    "Spoilt by Naration ."
    What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

    A different narrator .


    Would you recommend Rubicon to your friends? Why or why not?

    No , as a history it's not bad , but there are others to choose from .


    Who might you have cast as narrator instead of Steven Crossley?

    Sean Barrett . George Guidall . David Rintoul , Robert Glenister . There are any number of other narrators who are far more skilled .


    What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

    Frustration , Anger and Disappointment .


    Any additional comments?

    The number of mispunctuations beggar belief , the gasping for breath , the guttural swallowing is off putting in the extreme .

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    paul WORTHING, United Kingdom 25/05/2014
    paul WORTHING, United Kingdom 25/05/2014 Member Since 2013
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "I admit to skipping large pieces of this tome"

    I did listen to the first few chapters but they were a bit easy to forget and started to ramble on like soap opera, so in my impatience I skipped to Pompey and Caesar and all that which his really wonderful stuff and i'd happily listen to twice . Good job at my age I don't have to worry about facing an exam on it after !

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Thomas Stillorgan, Ireland 30/04/2014
    Thomas Stillorgan, Ireland 30/04/2014
    HELPFUL VOTES
    3
    ratings
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    "Good book, terrible version"
    Would you consider the audio edition of Rubicon to be better than the print version?

    definitely not - I found the audio quality dreadful, the tone of the narrator off-putting and the constant breaks in the audio irritating


    What other book might you compare Rubicon to, and why?

    I Claudius, the History of Rome podcasts, The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, the Twelve Caesars - all historical novels about Rome


    What didn’t you like about Steven Crossley’s performance?

    I bought a physical copy of the book, and tried listening to the audio book when driving to work, but incorrectly emphasized and overly bombastic sounding sentences made me turn it off. On top of that the audio recording seems to have been recorded in about 500 different takes which are not smoothly wound together.


    Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    I loved the book apart from the narration


    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    MR 23/02/2014
    MR 23/02/2014 Member Since 2010
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    "Excellent"
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    Not all good books make good audio books. This one does. And what a cast of characters!


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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  • Emily
    Philadelphia, PA, United States
    28/01/12
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Connects the Dots and Fills In the Gaps"
    Any additional comments?

    At one point in its history, Rome was ruled by toga wearing citizen soldiers who were elected by people so afraid of kings that the term of office was only one year. At another point in history, Rome was ruled by decadent and insane emperors who commanded their subjects to worship them as gods. This book explains how and why such a huge change could take place. The book has lively descriptions of the actions of the key players and does a great job in expanding on the motives and consequences of their choices. Highlights include Publius Clodius crashing a female only party in drag, Crassus’ severed head being used as a stage prop by Rome’s enemies in Parthia, Julius Caesar’s exciting campaign in Gaul, Cicero’s sarcastic court case speeches, and tales of grisly battles waged by Pompey Magnus a/k/a “the teenage butcher.” Both the writing organization and narrative style are excellent and I was enthralled. If you only could read one book about Rome, this is a good choice.

    14 of 14 people found this review helpful
  • Amazon Customer
    Sarasota, FL United States
    03/01/12
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Well-Written, Engaging Overview of Late Republic"

    I majored in classical history and studied this period pretty intensely - but that was twenty years ago. For me this was a wonderful refresher, engaging and fast-paced and very informative. I can't recommend it enough if you're interested in the period.

    I've knocked the Performance score because, while the narrator is quite good, there are a lot slightly over-long pauses, especially in the beginning. There are also numerous instances where you can hear him swallow or make other little noises, which is something I don't ever remember hearing on an audiobook before. I assume it was the producers fault. It's a minor distraction from a great listen.

    14 of 14 people found this review helpful
  • Alex
    ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO, United States
    03/09/12
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "The Roman Republic With a Hint of Melodrama"
    What did you love best about Rubicon?

    The way the facts are presented in a narrative fashion that allows you to stay engaged from start to finish.


    What was the most interesting aspect of this story? The least interesting?

    The special attention given to the rise and fall of Julius Caesar is amazing. You find yourself caring for Caesar, Cato and Pompey in a way that makes it somewhat heartbreaking when they meet their inevitable ends.


    What about Steven Crossley’s performance did you like?

    He is a great narrator in general, and his voice lends credence to the words.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    The death of Pompey Magnus.


    Any additional comments?

    I definitely recommend this, though be warned that if you're looking for the strictest historical account this may not exactly be it. The facts are all there (as well as anyone can say 2000 years after the fact), but Holland is no stranger to embellishment and emotion. The same things that make this book more engaging than your average historical account also detract, if only slightly, from the credibility.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • jackifus
    United States
    26/09/12
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Wonderfully Engaging"

    This great narrator brings the finely-written prose to life. I couldn't put this book down as the story builds to the climactic crumbling of the republic.

    I bought this book after listening to Dan Carlin's fantastic "Death Throes of the Republic" podcast series. This book complements Carlin's narrative so well that each makes me appreciate the other that much the more.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Mahal
    La Quinta, CA USA
    20/05/12
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Great Overall"
    Would you consider the audio edition of Rubicon to be better than the print version?

    Yes.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of Rubicon?

    The part where Pompi literally ends the Republic by forcing Mark Anthony and Ceasers other men in Rome out by a death threat. Then tries to say he is saving the Republic. He forced Ceasars hand and ended the Republic.


    Which character – as performed by Steven Crossley – was your favorite?

    Ceasar.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    When the senators forced Pompi to attack Ceaser in the east. Destroying any chance for them to gain power again. Pompi the general knew better, but the senators thinking they know it all ruined everything for them.


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Blue33
    29/07/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Much better available"
    Any additional comments?

    After hearing about this book through a podcast I decided to give it a go. If you are interested in this book, you doubtless know the story already. As for the story itself, Holland tries to put the person in the time and place, but save for a few interesting tidbits about Roman indulgences with oysters there were many things left out. I feel like I did not get to know any of the lesser characters better, which is what I hoped for (e.g., Cassius, Brutus, Milo, Scipio, Claudius, etc). I feel like it's a lazy glaze over the whole time period, without any detail on important aspects.

    As for the narration itself, there were many words that irritated me. Crossley prounounces 'C's as 'S', so LuCullus is LuSullus (obviously misspelled there for intent), which is made worse by his voice at a decent volume making 'S' sound like static feedback. Irritating throughout. At the end concluding with Augustus (pronounced OW-goose-tus by Crossley), he then switches his 'C's and 'S's to call Princeps "Preen-KEPS". This is obviously personal preference and arguments can be made both ways of pronunciation, but his emphasis seems at odds with what I've heard from other authors/readers. Again, I'm sure someone will argue that this is proper Latin (I wouldn't know), but this is my personal preference, and I am just reporting what I heard.

    My recommendation is to skip this book and download "The History of Rome", a free pod-cast by Mike Duncan (who takes some getting used to but comes by it honestly), or "Death Throes of the Republic" by Dan Carlin (also free podcast, and you can tell he is passionate about his history). Both go much more into detail about the people and events and are much easier to listen too.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Daniel
    29/06/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "sacrifices historical accuracy for drama"

    while mostly accurate, some parts seem to have been pulled out of Holland's arse for the purpose of extra drama.

    if that's your kind of thing, go for it. the story is interesting and the writing is wonderful too.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • KDM
    Novato, CA USA
    15/05/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Wonderful"

    Love Roman history and this was great! Enjoyed the performance and story and would love to hear more by this author and narrator.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • James
    Gulf Breeze, FL, United States
    13/03/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Pretty good if hard to follow"

    I won't blame the author for that. So many names, so many similar achievements and similar goals and all of them shifting alliances between the same group of people for about 60 years. Author does a fairly good job of keeping them straight enough.

    Anyone who complains about the narration has yet to hear a Bad narrator. He also gets better as it progresses.

    Sometimes repetitive feeling. I bought another book halfway through but was happy to finish this one afterwards.

    A good survey of what being an ambitious guy in Southern Europe around 50bc was like.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Cliff
    21/09/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Brilliant View of the Republic's Fall"
    If you could sum up Rubicon in three words, what would they be?

    After reading scores of books on; the Republic, Caesar, Augustus, Cleopatra, Cicero, Pompey and the cast of the elites on that most famous to times, I have to say that Tom Holland's book is the most insightful and brilliant. He makes the time come alive and the interdependency of aristocratic haughtier and the gross exploitation by the publicanaries shown for the witches brew it was. I a matter of decades, Rome conquers Asia, Syria, Pontus, Israel and a host of lesser kingdoms in the Middle East, followed by all of Spain and then Gaul are subjugated by the Legions adding province after province to be ruled by he 500 year old Roman Republican.

    But just at the pinnacle of its power the ancient Republic begins to break down into direct violence in the streets, into civil wars, all set with scenes of colossal villas with vast salt water fish ponds, parties and dancing, street brawls, postponed elections because of violence, and finally legions breaking the most ancient taboo - marching on Rome to restore order. The dizzying array of aristocrats, the new men, the conservatives - senators, Tribunes and Consuls forming and reforming alliances to tear down any man who rose too high.

    For the first time in Rome there were young grandees dancing naked at parties amid savage calls by their young fabulously wealthy young friends wearing loose togas. Tom Holland makes it all clearer than it has ever been told in his tale of the fall of the longest surviving and greatest Republic in the World - Rome. And in the wing waits Augustus reading the Imperium which will replace the Republic.. Tom Holland proposes that the Republic was wrecked by the very competitive argos it had used to fuel the Republic's power for so long its spectacular rise. The book i filled with new insights, and uncomfortably too close to certain modern equivalents.


    What about Steven Crossley’s performance did you like?

    The performance is very well done; Read with perfect pathos, irony, humor and insigy the Steven Crossley. A Bravo! performance.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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