We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.co.uk/access.
 >   > 
Killing the Rising Sun Audiobook

Killing the Rising Sun: How America Vanquished World War II Japan

Regular Price:£20.59
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • £7.99/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Publisher's Summary

The powerful and riveting new audiobook in the multimillion-selling Killing series by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard.

Autumn 1944. World War II is nearly over in Europe but is escalating in the Pacific, where American soldiers face an opponent who will go to any length to avoid defeat. The Japanese army follows the samurai code of Bushido, stipulating that surrender is a form of dishonor.

Killing the Rising Sun takes listeners to the bloody tropical-island battlefields of Peleliu and Iwo Jima and to the embattled Philippines, where General Douglas MacArthur has made a triumphant return and is plotting a full-scale invasion of Japan. Across the globe in Los Alamos, New Mexico, Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer and his team of scientists are preparing to test the deadliest weapon known to mankind. In Washington, DC, FDR dies in office, and Harry Truman ascends to the presidency only to face the most important political decision in history: whether to use that weapon. And in Tokyo, Emperor Hirohito, who is considered a deity by his subjects, refuses to surrender despite a massive and mounting death toll.

Told in the same pause-resistant style of Killing Lincoln, Killing Kennedy, Killing Jesus, Killing Patton, and Killing Reagan, this epic saga details the final moments of World War II like never before.

©2016 Bill O'Reilly & Martin Dugard (P)2016 Macmillan Audio

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

5.0 (4 )
5 star
 (4)
4 star
 (0)
3 star
 (0)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (0)
Overall
5.0 (4 )
5 star
 (4)
4 star
 (0)
3 star
 (0)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (0)
Story
4.8 (4 )
5 star
 (3)
4 star
 (1)
3 star
 (0)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (0)
Performance


There are no listener reviews for this title yet.

Sort by:
  • Sher from Provo
    Utah
    28/11/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Trying to Understand"

    I have been on a WWII binge for a couple of years, just hoping to understand it. I think I do understand much of what transpired in Europe, but the South Pacific theater of war has been a big ? This book went a long way in helping me understand why on earth the Japanese thought it would be a good thing to enter this war which ended up being basically between Japan and the U.S. Hmmm, was that a good decision? I think not. But Hirohito was much like Hitler in the fact that he refused to give up even in the face of insurmountable odds. What the U.S. did they had to do. Makes me sick to my stomach, but it is true. The one redeeming fact is that the U.S. helped Japan rebuild and actually became friends with them. I believe our alliance with Japan has been a blessing to our people and theirs. I wasn't alive during WWII, but I can honestly say this. I have never met a Japanese person that I didn't like. Not that I know that many, but the friendships I have with the ones I know I cherish.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Mike From Mesa
    Mesa, AZ
    25/10/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Skimming the surface"

    I have read a great many books about World War II including books covering the German-Russian part of the conflict, the Western Allies invasion of France in 1944 and the war in the Pacific Theater and am thus very familiar with the major events leading to the defeat of Germany, Italy and Japan. When I buy more books concerning the war I look for something different from what I already know - perhaps something centering on the politics of the war, or perhaps a book on the efforts to successfully complete the Manhattan Project. Mr O’Reilly’s book turns out to be a rather light skimming of the last year of the war with some needed concentration on how brutal the war against Japan became and the reasons for that violence, but brings little new information.

    Perhaps the best parts of this book are the concentrations on the efforts of the Marines to conquer the Pacific Islands, an explanation as to just how difficult those battles were, how little quarter was given by either side to the other and the terrible estimates that those in charge of the invasions made concerning how much effort it would take to conquer places like Peleliu and Iwo Jima as well as a description of just how much suffering the atom bombs caused in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The latter is especially hard to listen to, but is balanced by details about both the Japanese atrocities in China and against US prisoners of war including the execution of some American POWs after the war against Japan had ended.

    However, much of the rest of the book seems superficial and much information is missing. While this book may be a very good read for those who have not already read much on the Pacific Theater in World War II there is little here that will add to information those well read on the subject will already have and some of the information is either incorrect or misleading. Some examples:

    Mr O’Reilly makes a point that the invasion of the Pacific Islands are “unique” in that the troops involved in the invasion had to travel 4000 miles from the US rather than the 20 miles from England to Normandy, but completely ignores the amphibious invasions of North Africa (Operation Torch) where some US troops sailed from the US rather than from England and thus covered a similar distance to the landings. Thus the Pacific Landings were not “unique” in the distances covered.

    Mr O’Reilly makes a statement that the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor led to the US declaration of war against Japan and Germany. This is incorrect as the Pearl Harbor attack only led to a US declaration of war against Japan. The US did not declare war on Germany until Germany, 4 days later, declared war on the US.

    Mr O’Reilly makes the statement that Douglas MacArthur, in this 5 star rank, was the ranking general on both sides of the war. While he did rank above Dwight Eisenhower his date of rank, and thus his seniority, placed him below George Marshall.

    Aside from the incorrect statements in the book the most annoying thing for me was an omission. Mr O’Reilly covers the dropping of the atomic bombs on Japan and the subsequent dithering of the Japanese on the subject of surrender and the decision as to whether or not to continue the bombing campaign, but makes no mention of whether there were any more atomic bombs to drop. I have seen several statements that there were, and there were not, additional atomic bombs available and it would have been nice to have had some kind of historic statement in a book concerning whether or not those bombs were actually available.

    While the book is interesting reading I can only recommend it for those with no prior knowledge of the Pacific Theater in World War II. Whose who have already read about the Pacific war will find little or nothing really new here, however I have no hesitation in recommending it to those not already familiar with the Pacific war. Just understand that this is not a deep look into the war but rather a surface reading of those events. The narration is first class.

    5 of 6 people found this review helpful
  • Mastiff Enthusiast
    Colorado Springs, CO United States
    05/11/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "good intro to ww2 pacific theater history"

    nothing deep, nothing new, but if you know nothing about it, a good place to start.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Don
    Schaumburg, IL, United States
    21/10/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Throughly enjoyed"

    Had relatives in conflict, also fellow Marines. I found Bill's fascinating and a real eye opener.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Jenni McCullar
    21/10/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Great book!"

    As a history and government teacher at a high school in northern Nevada, I have really thoroughly enjoyed this and all your other "killing books". You have a uniquely compelling talent for telling a story while maintaining the historical aspect of the events.
    Sincerely
    JF McCullar

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • James Marks
    12/10/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "great job with the book and looking forward to n"

    loved it and I will get the next one when it comes out later if can

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • CARL
    PHILADELPHIA, PA, United States
    11/10/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "history/truth told interestingly."

    As expected from Bill o'Riley, history/truth told interestingly.
    I really like many personal details told about the characters;
    very Dickensian, but about real people.
    Quite gruesome; as war truly is.
    Not recommended reading for the faint-hearted;
    nor for those who don't wish to face the realities of battle against a brutal, evil enemy.

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • karen
    27/09/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "rehash of war in the pacific"

    One sided view of the war with Japan. O'reilly doesnt understand the history or political structure of Japan, especially the role of a Japanese Emperor who has never held any real power ever. Really is no point for him to write this book..plenty of others just like it...sick of all the stupid read footnotes...put that info the form of a paragraph or leave it out. His Killing Lincoln and Kennedy books were great since they encompassed a short period of time with a smaller cast..but this is too broad a subject to tackle in this style with ssoooooooo much background involved it would take him a decade of research that he is not commited to ...


    11 of 16 people found this review helpful
  • ProDriver75
    OWENSBORO, KY, US
    15/09/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "excellent and enlightening"

    What a great book! Excellent performance by the narrator. Being somewhat of a history buff particularly World War II I was very interested to listen to this book. Everyone should I highly recommend it

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Scott
    California
    13/09/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Wished it was read by Bill O'Reilly"

    I'm only on chapter 4 but the story so far is great, as expected. Part of the wonderful story telling in the "Killing" series the narration by Bill O'Reilly. I love his tone, inflection and the passion that comes across in his voice by telling the story he helped pen. It's just not the same with a different narrator.

    18 of 29 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank you.

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.