We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.co.uk/access.
The Illumination Audiobook

The Illumination

Regular Price:£17.99
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • £7.99/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Publisher's Summary

At 8:17 on a Friday night, the Illumination commences. Every wound begins to shine, every bruise to glow and shimmer. And in the aftermath of a fatal car accident, a private journal of love notes, written by a husband to his wife, passes into the keeping of a hospital patient and from there through the hands of five other suffering people, touching each of them uniquely.

©2011 Kevin Brockmeier (P)2011 Recorded Books LLC

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

3.7 (3 )
5 star
 (1)
4 star
 (1)
3 star
 (0)
2 star
 (1)
1 star
 (0)
Overall
2.5 (2 )
5 star
 (0)
4 star
 (1)
3 star
 (0)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (1)
Story
4.0 (2 )
5 star
 (1)
4 star
 (0)
3 star
 (1)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (0)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    Isolde 19/08/2011
    Isolde 19/08/2011 Member Since 2011
    HELPFUL VOTES
    14
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    49
    11
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "Love, Pain and the Private Life of Texts"

    There are two premises for this story, which are revealed early in the narrative, so no real spoilers here! The first is that pain, an intimately subjective and isolating experience, becomes visible as light. The second premise is the life of a private journal of love notes, passed from hand to hand. The result is a compelling, fascinating and moving collection of six personal stories, some of which cover a number of weeks, others over years.
    The most striking element for me is the exploration of physical and emotional pain and sickness, and what might happen if these could no longer be hidden from view. For some, it means a fascination with the body, for others, a wrestle with concepts of soul and divinity. As a chronic pain sufferer, this makes it a book very close to my heart.
    The book also explores the effects that texts have on one another, and plays with one-sided conversations, non-verbal communications, and the differing perspectives of readers exploring the same text. This is a treat for lovers of language.
    It is a good audio presentation, with decent narration. The reader's interpretations can sometimes encroach on the listener's experience of the text, but it is rare enough to find a reading where that does not happen. In one particular section, it can be difficult to identify where one authorial voice ends and another begins, and without any knowledge of how this is represented in the print ediction, I cannot comment on whether certain disorienting features are deliberate or not.
    All in all, this is a book I will treasure, and have already recommended it to many friends.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Sam 04/02/2015
    Sam 04/02/2015 Member Since 2014
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    3
    2
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Great idea, terribly done"

    The concept of the illumination is really brilliant so it's quite astounding that Kevin Brockmeyer has managed to write a book in which nothing happens. Odd characters loosely tied together by the thread of a journal of love letters I was expecting there to be a point to it all. If boredom were pain I would be shining brightly with it.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
Sort by:
  • Matthew
    Singapore, Singapore
    21/07/13
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Completely intriguing but ultimately disappointing"

    This book had two fascinating central ideas: (a) the concept of hidden pain becoming visible; and (b) the power of something precious passing from one person to another.

    So the first chapter of “The Illumination” had me hooked… I couldn’t wait to see how things unraveled. But now that I’ve reached the end, I’m left with an overwhelming sense of disillusionment… forgive the pun. My disappointments are threefold:

    (1) Despite the intriguing framing, I was bored of these same two ideas being recycled for the entire 9 hour duration. By the end, if I had to hear one more synonym of light (or bright, shining, illuminating, shimmering etc…), I thought I would scream. Describing the illumination event could have carried a single chapter, not the entire book.
    (2) Things get weird at the end. I won’t say anything more than that.
    (3) In the end, the biggest frustration was the feeling of unmet potential. I desperately wanted the protagonists to interact more. Or overlap more. Or learn more. Or evolve more. Or anything. I wanted to be immersed in a mystic journey, not just hear a description of a mystic event.

    Having said that, Brockmeier sure does have a talent for description. The prose is beautiful. That is one piece of praise I can lavish quite freely. There is no doubt that Kevin Brockmeier is ridiculously talented, with a mind full of great ideas. I will definitely read his next novel, in the hope it retains the central beauty of “The Illumination” but gets packaged in something more ultimately satisfying.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank you.

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.