We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.co.uk/access.
A Full Life Audiobook

A Full Life: Reflections at Ninety

Regular Price:£16.69
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • £7.99/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Publisher's Summary

Grammy Award, Best Spoken Word Album, 2016

Jimmy Carter, 39th president, Nobel Peace Prize winner, international humanitarian, fisherman, reflects on his full and happy life with pride, humor, and a few second thoughts.

At 90, Jimmy Carter reflects on his public and private life with a frankness that is disarming. He adds detail and emotion about his youth in rural Georgia that he described in his magnificent An Hour Before Daylight. He discusses racism and the isolation of the Carters. He describes the brutality of the hazing regimen at Annapolis, how he nearly lost his life twice serving on submarines, and his amazing interview with Admiral Rickover. He describes the profound influence his mother had on him and how he admired his father even though he didn't emulate him. He admits that he decided to quit the navy and later enter politics without consulting his wife, Rosalynn, and how appalled he is in retrospect.

In A Full Life, Carter tells what he is proud of and what he might do differently. He discusses his regret at losing his reelection but how he and Rosalynn pushed on and made a new life and second and third rewarding careers. He is frank about the presidents who have succeeded him, world leaders, and his passions for the causes he cares most about, particularly the condition of women and the deprived people of the developing world.

This is a wise and moving look back from this remarkable man. Jimmy Carter has lived one of our great American lives - from rural obscurity to world fame, universal respect, and contentment. A Full Life is an extraordinary listen.

©2015 Jimmy Carter (P)2015 Simon & Schuster

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.3 (12 )
5 star
 (7)
4 star
 (4)
3 star
 (0)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (1)
Overall
4.6 (10 )
5 star
 (6)
4 star
 (4)
3 star
 (0)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (0)
Story
4.5 (10 )
5 star
 (5)
4 star
 (5)
3 star
 (0)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (0)
Performance


There are no listener reviews for this title yet.

Sort by:
  • JMC
    17/01/17
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Initially good, but southern charm wears off"
    Is there anything you would change about this book?

    This book reminds me of what I tell my supervisor . . . that, "a series of anecdotes does not a good manager make." Except, in this case, it's "a good story make." The voice can get hard to follow at times, and the poetry readings reminded me of (was it?) Cheech and Chong saying, "Wrote a story 'bout it. Wanna hear it? Here'it go!". Not a lot of meat in this writing . . . more like listening to an old southern gent reminisce on his life before the rest home. Only, he was the president. More of the dirty details (besides those that emphasized how the world was out to get him despite his universal fairness) would have been nice.


    If you’ve listened to books by Jimmy Carter before, how does this one compare?

    I haven't.


    What didn’t you like about Jimmy Carter’s performance?

    Personal, but sometimes not so audible.


    Did A Full Life inspire you to do anything?

    No. I'd hoped it would, as I heard Carter had had a hard life and been an overcomer, but it was nothing my sharecropping greatgrandparents hadn't gone through, well, except they were black and didn't have a way to "hard work" themselves out of racism.


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • John Perry Mayhew
    14/07/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A truly great southern American"

    Loved listening to President Carter read the book. I will say having a low country Carolina accent myself helped me understand his heavy southern accent. It also made me respect the great man he is.

    7 of 9 people found this review helpful
  • Michael J. Steimling
    Danville, Pa United States
    17/12/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "very good"

    Carter's book is a very good read. It has a nice chronological theme in general. At some points it approaches the topics with a cause and effect of specific issues presented during president Carter's time in the white House. He proceeds to follow up these issues to modern times to show how it has effected the modern world. Thank you, president Carter for this encompassing view of your life, political career, and a touch into the workings and causes of your center.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Scott Volltrauer
    19/08/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Loved it"

    I was looking for a memoir of an interesting person who is currently in their 80s or 90s. I was hoping to enjoy the journey reflecting on their lives while looking for wisdom to apply to my own journey.

    "A Full Life" hit the mark on every level. The fact that it was read by the author was an unexpectedly big bonus.

    I will look for other similar audiobooks read by their author hoping they will come close to how exceptional this one addressed my interests

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • A User
    25/11/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Amazing Reflections"

    Explicit recall of personal and historical events-- some of which have drifted from memory . Carters's voice and his own words make these events current again.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Adam Shields
    Marietta, GA, USA
    22/10/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Regardless of your politics, Carter is a fascinati"

    Carter is a fascinating man. I have read a couple of his books, but this the first of his that is more more memoir than policy.

    I listened to this as an audiobook and he narrates it himself. This feels like a bit of a wrap up, especially since his recent cancer diagnosis. There is not a sense of finality about it, but rather a wrapping up.

    Carter gives a brief review of his life. If you did not know anything about him, this is a good place to start. He spends time talking about his presidency, but not too much. A Full Life is about his life in general including politics, but not exclusively politics.

    If anything it is the political portions that are less interesting. Carter, like many experts, thinks he is right. So the last chapter where he is talking about his post presidency and how he has interacted in the world has more than several places where he directly says that he thinks the world would be better off if the presidents after him had followed his policy or had listened to his advice or had let him help more. In some cases he might be right, in some cases I think he was likely wrong. But those sections are few.

    Part of what is always interesting to me about listening to first person narrative from people toward the end of their lives is what they talk about. Carter certainly talks about his legacy and the things he tried to do. But he also is proud of his kids, he adores his wife. He is proud of some of his positions on race and integration. He also spends times talking about how much he loves woodworking and furniture making (I had no idea). And how much his mother was involved in his politics and the legacy his father left.

    The world has changed. Carter as a boy of 12 earned money by selling boiled peanuts. Most days he could earn as much as a field laborer if not more. And because he didn’t have a family to support he saved most of that money. He bought foreclosed homes as rental property investments and fixed them up himself. By the time he went to college he had a number of properties, but his father did not want to take care of them while he was at college so sold them while Carter was away.

    I think Carter will probably be judged less harshly over time. He was the president in a difficult time. He did not make all good decisions, but he did leave not do as much damage as many want to blame him for. It is a brief book worth reading.

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Phil
    Texas
    11/08/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Good story told by a good man"

    Next I will have my 19 year old son hear President
    Carter tell his story so that he may have hope in our system and in humanity.
    Good man can come to be leaders!
    If i may be so informal I like to say, thank you Jimmy.

    5 of 7 people found this review helpful
  • Sydney guy
    05/08/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "An unexpected, enjoyable audiobook"

    This is an enjoyable audiobook narrated by the author. It feels like an extended chat with a former president. Very enjoyable.

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Jean
    Santa Cruz, CA, United States
    19/07/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Stimulating"

    I saw an interview with Jimmy Carter on the PBS Newshour, and that interview triggered me to buy the book. I was amazed at how much Carter has done and been in his ninety years. He has been Governor of Georgia, President of the United States, a naval officer, a cotton and peanut farmer, philanthropist and author. He also has been a professor at Emory University for the past 33 years. Carter has written over 30 books and one of the books was a Pulitzer Prize finalist, he also was a Nobel Peace prize recipient.

    In this book Carter tells about his formative year growing up on a farm in Georgia. He goes into depth about his years at the United States Naval Academy and his eleven years in the Navy.

    In the book Carter describes the race problems growing up and living in the Deep South throughout his lifespan. He describes the harassment and ostracizing his family faced because he voted for integration. He goes into his time working his way through local and state politics in Georgia. He states Plains schools did not admit a black student until 1962, thirteen years after the United States Supreme Courts Brown V Board of Education decision.

    Carter briefly goes into his time as President but spends most of the rest of the book about life since he left office. He provided lots of information on the Carter Center and his role as a gadfly. The book also contains some of his poems. Jimmy Carter narrated the book himself. I understand the print version also has pictures of some of his paintings.

    9 of 13 people found this review helpful
  • DEB
    NC
    12/07/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Jimmy deserve better than he gets."

    Most presidents are done when their terms are over. Not President Carter. He has lived a full life after Washington. He's done good.

    6 of 9 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank you.

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.