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Technology

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Dave

Dave BirminghamUnited Kingdom Member Since 2009
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  • "Brilliant!"

    Overall

    The author makes even the driest of subject matter engaging and entertaining. I now feel more knowledgeable about nearly everything!

    More

    A Short History of Nearly Everything

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 1 min)
    • By Bill Bryson
    • Narrated By William Roberts
    Overall
    (1809)
    Performance
    (457)
    Story
    (452)

    A Short History of Nearly Everything is Bill Bryson's fascinating and humorous quest to understand everything that has happened from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization. He takes subjects that normally bore the pants off most of us, like geology, chemistry, and particle physics, and aims to render them comprehensible to people who have never thought they could be interested in science. In the company of some extraordinary scientists, Bill Bryson reveals the world in a way most of us have never seen it before.

    Roy says: "A short Review of Nearly Everything"
  1. A Short History of Nearly...
  2. .

A Peek at Jim Vaughan's Bookshelf

Helpful
Votes
82
 
29 REVIEWS / 37 ratings Member Since 2010 48 Followers / Following 1
 
Jim Vaughan's greatest hits:
  • Cypherpunks: Freedom and the Future of the Internet

    "Paranoia or Prescience?"

    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Like Assange himself, I think this book will strongly divide people. It certainly aroused conflicting feelings in me.

    It starts with a stark warning. We are sleepwalking into a surveillance society, of constantly being watched, where every detail of our lives, everything we say or write, every website we visit, our histories, preferences, misdemeanours and even gossip about us, are collected and stored by corporations and governments - essentially forever. This is contrasted with an increasing cloak of secrecy surrounding those with power, as they increasingly take control of the infrastructure of the Internet. This is the very opposite of the liberation the old style hackers and cypherpunks envisaged for the Internet.

    Following that dramatic introduction, the majority of the book is a four way discussion on the implications of this. At times it verges on the paranoid, at other times it is like four blokes down the pub, speculating on possibilities for a future dystopia.

    Several themes recur: the "Four Horsemen of the Infopocalypse" are the rationale used by governments to justify increasing surveillance and censorship, which the book repeatedly seems to ridicule.

    Here I started to have my doubts, for these seem to me serious societal problems, and perhaps the price of more security, is more surveillance - and that is a price worth paying.

    Moreover, the strong recommendation of universal personal encryption measures, to evade surveillance, such as TOR for anonymous surfing, BitCoin for anonymous financial transactions, encrypted email clients etc. left me wondering why I would want to go to such lengths to hide what I see, buy, or write. Id be a little bemused if MI5 took a serious interest.

    Then I read about Justin Carter, who was arrested and held for 5 months in Texas as a potential terrorist for making a sick joke on Facebook, and government starts to look less benign and more paranoid, and oppressive - and I concede that maybe Assange is on to something. As I write this the UK government is planning universal censorship by ISPs by default.

    So, it's a worrying book, the narration is pitched just right, and it left me thinking seriously about the whole area of security, freedom, censorship and surveillance. That can only be a good thing.

  • Atomic Awakening: A New Look at the History and Future of Nuclear Power

    "Futuristic, tense, stranger than fiction history!"

    Overall
    Performance
    Story

    Starting slow, but building to a crescendo, this is the exciting story of the exploration of the sub-atomic realm, radioactivity, and the inspiring intellectual challenges, successes and terrible blunders made by the many individuals and nations in the race to harness nuclear power both as a devastating weapon, and an inexhaustible supply of useful energy.

    As an insider to the Nuclear industry, Mahaffey knows his stuff, and he pitches the balance between scientific theory and social narrative just right, in my opinion. Some slightly quirky references to the supernatural in his introduction are rapidly left behind as he charts the history of the discovery of atomic structure, the isolation of neutrons among the various curious emissions of the first discovered radioactive elements such as Radium, Polonium and Uranium and the destabilising impact of very slow or very fast neutrons on the fissile nuclei of these same elements. The book has many nice anecdotes such as the famous "traffic light" moment - the sudden realisation of the potentially huge energy that could be released in a nuclear chain reaction. The tale really takes off as the race to build a super-bomb during the war gathers pace.

    A satisfying irony of history described in the book, is that it was the anti-semitism of the Nazis that so handicapped the German atom-bomb project, and gave such a decisive final advantage to the Allies. To quote one wag "We got there first because our German scientists were better than their German scientists"!

    Mahaffey then goes on to describe the post-war development of the nuclear industry, as well as the further development of a variety of military nuclear hardware, reactors, rockets etc. including the fusion bomb, and the leaking of secrets to the USSR. He misses no detail out, for instance in describing the principles behind major competing reactor designs, the Cold War politics of the time, and the notorious accidents, including Winscale, 3 Mile Island and Chenobyl, as well as some less well known incidents (such as the deliberate suicidal removal of the central control rod in one military reactor) with the political as well as nuclear fallout that resulted.

    These accidents, increasing capital costs, plus a growing opposition to nuclear energy changed the dream of free energy into the public image nightmare of a costly, dangerous, long lasting radioactive contaminant producing technology. However, if there is a moral to the book, it is that this fear we must overcome. He lays his cards on the table in his opposition to the "anti nuclear movement" who in his opinion may prevent us utilising this clean, safe, inexhaustible form of energy, through prejudice. Its time we looked again at nuclear energy. One area he surprisingly does not explore is nuclear fusion as a source of energy.

    All in all, it is an excellent book, read in a slightly "American heroic" style, reminiscent of those 1950s information films (which sort of feels appropriate). It exemplifies all the scientific excitement of a futuristic technology, the cold war tension of a secret super-weapon, the adrenaline of nuclear disaster, and the sometimes stranger than fiction truthfulness of a historical account. Much to think about!

  • A Short History of Nearly Everything

    "A brilliant Bryson travelogue through Science."

    Overall

    This is a delightful, funny, Bill Bryson travelogue through the history of the Cosmos, and how we got here. It's full of interesting discoveries, from the Big Bang, to the evolution of Victorian shooting parties dedicated to hunting rare species to extinction. In true Brysonesque manner, it is peppered with funny anecdotes about the often weird and wonderful characters behind each discovery - like the dinosaur hunters; Marsh and Peabody, who's competitive hatred of each other spurred them to such frenetic heights of palentology that between throwing rocks at each other (literally!) they discovered most of the dinosaurs the average person can name. Or the villainous Richard Owen who's seated statue used to preside in the Natural History museum, who suppressed, erased and stole other people's discoveries to claim the credit as his own.



    One recurrent theme of the book is how often important scientific insights have been ignored or suppressed by those with influence. Lord Kelvin, though a great scientist retarded a true appreciation of the age of the Earth, because of his insistence that it could not be more than a few hundred thousand years old. Plate tectonics was dismissed as ridiculous for decades, despite mounting evidence and the obvious visual and geological jig-saw fit of the continents.



    This is a delightful "Cooks Tour" of almost every aspect of Science, and of scientific history, covering a huge range of disciplines, and with Bill Brysons characteristic wit and charm. I love his travel books, and this audiobook - journeying through time and nature is no exception.

Jim

Jim Twickenham, United Kingdom 07/06/2014 Member Since 2011
HELPFUL VOTES
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  • "Important and thought provoking"

    1 of 1 helpful votes

    The authors argue that digitial technology (in which they embrace computers, networks, the internet, smartphones etc) is accelerating the pace of tehcnologocal advancement at an exponential rate because of the phenomenon of combinatory innovation. So my laptop may not feel radically different to me compared to the one I had three years ago but a combination of it and the internet made it possible for Audible to create a business selling cheap audiobooks. So I can plough through potentially challenging reads like this in a weekend before moving onto whatever I find useful or interesting next. This in turn not only enriches my leisure time but also helps me learn stuff I can put to use at work for career advancement. The downside of that trend is that a few years after, say, the digital camera is invented Kodak go bust and that's not just bad news for Kodak employees; it's part of a wider phenomenon in which well paid jobs for ordinary people disappear and they're not replaced because the internet based enterprises that replace them just don't employ that many people. Worse still while the overall level of cash in the economy (referred to here as the "bounty") might stay the same or even increase it gets shared out in increasingly inequitable ways (a phenomenon called "the spread"). What does it all mean, where will it end up and what can we do about it?

    What I really liked about this book was the way the authors set out the issues, illustrate the impact they are already having, predict where it will go next and suggest what we should do about it at the level of public policy, education, planning our own careers and thiking about what to tell our kids (postgraduate qualifications may be the new degree). They identify the types of jobs that might be vulnerable (clerical, manufacturing and increasingly professional jobs requiring repetitive tasks fo areas of accountancy, law and medicine could be under threat) and those which look safer (problem solving or creative roles aided by computers or less well paid service jobs).

    Recommended for anyone interested in the future of technology and work.

    More

    The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 49 mins)
    • By Erik Brynjolfsson, Andrew McAfee
    • Narrated By TBA
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (16)
    Performance
    (15)
    Story
    (15)

    In recent years, Google's autonomous cars have logged thousands of miles on American highways and IBM's Watson trounced the best human Jeopardy! players. Digital technologies - with hardware, software, and networks at their core - will in the near future diagnose diseases more accurately than doctors can, apply enormous data sets to transform retailing, and accomplish many tasks once considered uniquely human.

    Jim says: "Important and thought provoking"

What's Trending in Technology:

  • 4.9 (14 ratings)
    The Joy of Science  by The Great Courses, Robert M. Hazen Narrated by Professor Robert M. Hazen

    The Joy of Science

    • ORIGINAL (30 hrs and 31 mins)
    • By The Great Courses, Robert M. Hazen
    • Narrated By Professor Robert M. Hazen
    Overall
    (14)
    Performance
    (12)
    Story
    (9)

    Science is humanity's greatest achievement. It ranges from the study of the universe itself to the smallest particles of matter contained within it - and everything in between. If you want to better understand our physical world, as most of us do, gaining a basic understanding of science itself is profoundly important - yet many are intimidated by the breathtaking scope of such an endeavor. Now an award-winning science teacher has taken out the intimidation, harnessing that breathtaking scope into a series of 60 exciting, comprehensive, and accessible lectures.

  • 4.3 (1809 ratings)
    A Short History of Nearly Everything (






UNABRIDGED) by Bill Bryson Narrated by William Roberts

    A Short History of Nearly Everything

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 1 min)
    • By Bill Bryson
    • Narrated By William Roberts
    Overall
    (1809)
    Performance
    (457)
    Story
    (452)

    A Short History of Nearly Everything is Bill Bryson's fascinating and humorous quest to understand everything that has happened from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization. He takes subjects that normally bore the pants off most of us, like geology, chemistry, and particle physics, and aims to render them comprehensible to people who have never thought they could be interested in science. In the company of some extraordinary scientists, Bill Bryson reveals the world in a way most of us have never seen it before.

    Roy says: "A short Review of Nearly Everything"
  • 4.3 (317 ratings)
    In the Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives (






UNABRIDGED) by Steven Levy Narrated by L. J. Ganser

    In the Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 52 mins)
    • By Steven Levy
    • Narrated By L. J. Ganser
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (317)
    Performance
    (88)
    Story
    (89)

    Few companies in history have ever been as successful and as admired as Google, the company that has transformed the Internet and become an indispensable part of our lives. How has Google done it? Veteran technology reporter Steven Levy was granted unprecedented access to the company, and in this revelatory book he takes listeners inside Google headquarters - the Googleplex - to explain how Google works.

    Mrs says: "Great listen"
  • 4.3 (48 ratings)
    Who Says Elephants Can't Dance?: Inside IBM's Historic Turnaround (






UNABRIDGED) by Louis V. Gerstner Narrated by Edward Herrmann

    Who Says Elephants Can't Dance?: Inside IBM's Historic Turnaround

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 34 mins)
    • By Louis V. Gerstner
    • Narrated By Edward Herrmann
    Overall
    (48)
    Performance
    (15)
    Story
    (17)

    In 1990, IBM had its most profitable year ever. By 1993, the company was on a watch list for extinction, victimized by its own lumbering size, an insular corporate culture, and the PC era IBM had itself helped invent.

    Jacob says: "Really enjoyed it."
  •  
  • 4.3 (40 ratings)
    Chaos: Making a New Science (






UNABRIDGED) by James Gleick Narrated by Rob Shapiro

    Chaos: Making a New Science

    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 52 mins)
    • By James Gleick
    • Narrated By Rob Shapiro
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (40)
    Performance
    (16)
    Story
    (17)

    James Gleick explains the theories behind the fascinating new science called chaos. Alongside relativity and quantum mechanics, it is being hailed as the 20th century's third revolution.

    jeremy says: "Riveting, but requires full attention"
  • 4.4 (38 ratings)
    Hatching Twitter: A True Story of Money, Power, Friendship, and Betrayal (






UNABRIDGED) by Nick Bilton Narrated by Daniel May

    Hatching Twitter: A True Story of Money, Power, Friendship, and Betrayal

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 55 mins)
    • By Nick Bilton
    • Narrated By Daniel May
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (38)
    Performance
    (36)
    Story
    (35)

    Since 2006, Twitter has grown from 100 obsessive users to more than 500 million today - over 32 million of those in the UK alone. But how did such a radical transformation happen in just five years, and what does it mean for business, politics and the internet?

    darek says: "My favorite book for quiet long time."
  • 4.4 (28 ratings)
    Complications: A Surgeon's Notes on an Imperfect Science (






ABRIDGED) by Atul Gawande Narrated by William David Griffith

    Complications: A Surgeon's Notes on an Imperfect Science

    • ABRIDGED (7 hrs and 48 mins)
    • By Atul Gawande
    • Narrated By William David Griffith
    Overall
    (28)
    Performance
    (8)
    Story
    (8)

    Sometimes in medicine the only way to know what is truly going on in a patient is to operate, to look inside with one's own eyes. This book is exploratory surgery on medicine itself, laying bare a science not in its idealized form but as it actually is - complicated, perplexing, and profoundly human.

    D. Brown says: "Surprising and shocking insights"
  • A Short History of Nearly Everything (






UNABRIDGED) by Bill Bryson Narrated by William Roberts

    A Short History of Nearly Everything

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 1 min)
    • By Bill Bryson
    • Narrated By William Roberts
    Overall
    (1809)
    Performance
    (457)
    Story
    (452)

    A Short History of Nearly Everything is Bill Bryson's fascinating and humorous quest to understand everything that has happened from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization. He takes subjects that normally bore the pants off most of us, like geology, chemistry, and particle physics, and aims to render them comprehensible to people who have never thought they could be interested in science. In the company of some extraordinary scientists, Bill Bryson reveals the world in a way most of us have never seen it before.

    Roy says: "A short Review of Nearly Everything"
  • Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies

    • UNABRIDGED (14 hrs and 16 mins)
    • By Nick Bostrom
    • Narrated By Napoleon Ryan
    Overall
    (0)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    Superintelligence asks the questions: What happens when machines surpass humans in general intelligence? Will artificial agents save or destroy us? Nick Bostrom lays the foundation for understanding the future of humanity and intelligent life. The human brain has some capabilities that the brains of other animals lack. It is to these distinctive capabilities that our species owes its dominant position. If machine brains surpassed human brains in general intelligence, then this new superintelligence could become extremely powerful - possibly beyond our control.

  • Console Wars: Sega, Nintendo, and the Battle That Defined a Generation (






UNABRIDGED) by Blake J. Harris Narrated by Fred Berman

    Console Wars: Sega, Nintendo, and the Battle That Defined a Generation

    • UNABRIDGED (20 hrs and 41 mins)
    • By Blake J. Harris
    • Narrated By Fred Berman
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (14)
    Performance
    (13)
    Story
    (13)

    A mesmerizing, behind-the-scenes business thriller that chronicles how Sega, a small, scrappy gaming company led by an unlikely visionary and a team of rebels, took on the juggernaut Nintendo and revolutionized the videogame industry. In 1990, Nintendo had a virtual monopoly on the videogame industry. Sega, on the other hand, was just a faltering arcade company with big aspirations and even bigger personalities. But all that would change with the arrival of Tom Kalinske.

    Philip says: "An interesting tale, poorly told"
  • The Joy of Science  by The Great Courses, Robert M. Hazen Narrated by Professor Robert M. Hazen

    The Joy of Science

    • ORIGINAL (30 hrs and 31 mins)
    • By The Great Courses, Robert M. Hazen
    • Narrated By Professor Robert M. Hazen
    Overall
    (14)
    Performance
    (12)
    Story
    (9)

    Science is humanity's greatest achievement. It ranges from the study of the universe itself to the smallest particles of matter contained within it - and everything in between. If you want to better understand our physical world, as most of us do, gaining a basic understanding of science itself is profoundly important - yet many are intimidated by the breathtaking scope of such an endeavor. Now an award-winning science teacher has taken out the intimidation, harnessing that breathtaking scope into a series of 60 exciting, comprehensive, and accessible lectures.

  •  
  • Modern Warfare, Intelligence and Deterrence: The Technologies That Are Transforming Them: The Economist (






UNABRIDGED) by Benjamin Sutherland Narrated by Chistopher Oxford

    Modern Warfare, Intelligence and Deterrence: The Technologies That Are Transforming Them: The Economist

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 35 mins)
    • By Benjamin Sutherland
    • Narrated By Chistopher Oxford
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (16)
    Performance
    (14)
    Story
    (15)

    This Economist book describes emerging military technologies and places them in the larger context of today's politics, diplomacy, business and social issues. It shows how efforts to win wars or keep the peace are driving enormous and multifold technological advances. Broadly speaking, defence technologies will continue to provide enormous advantages to advanced, Western armed forces. For anyone who wants to know just how smart the global war, defence and intelligence machine is, this will be revealing and fascinating reading.

    Collyermum says: "Interesting review of latest warfare technology"
  • Digital Wars: Apple, Google, Microsoft, and the Battle for the Internet (






UNABRIDGED) by Charles Arthur Narrated by Stephen Rashbrook

    Digital Wars: Apple, Google, Microsoft, and the Battle for the Internet

    • UNABRIDGED (11 hrs and 2 mins)
    • By Charles Arthur
    • Narrated By Stephen Rashbrook
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (44)
    Performance
    (32)
    Story
    (34)

    Digital Wars starts in 1998, when the Internet and computing business was about to be upended - by an antitrust case, a tiny start-up and a former giant rebuilding it. Charles Arthur here examines the differing strategies of the three best-known tech companies in their battle to win control of the exploding network connecting the world. Microsoft was a giant - soon to become the highest-valued company in the world - while Apple was a minnow and Google just a start-up. By February 2012, Apple was worth more than both Microsoft and Google combined.

    Lee says: "Fascinating"
  • On Top of the Cloud: How CIOs Leverage New Technologies to Drive Change and Build Value Across the Enterprise (






UNABRIDGED) by Hunter Muller Narrated by Paul Neal Rohrer

    On Top of the Cloud: How CIOs Leverage New Technologies to Drive Change and Build Value Across the Enterprise

    • UNABRIDGED (3 hrs and 45 mins)
    • By Hunter Muller
    • Narrated By Paul Neal Rohrer
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (0)
    Story
    (0)

    An absolute must-listen for every CIO, On Top of the Cloud takes you into the heads of smart, talented, and experienced CIOs who are trying to figure out the best ways to take advantage of the cloud and make it work for their organizations. Author Hunter Muller reveals how the cloud is changing the way we consume IT, leverage existing infrastructure, and deploy technology to provide essential services that help competitive organizations win new customers and open new markets.

  • In the Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives (






UNABRIDGED) by Steven Levy Narrated by L. J. Ganser

    In the Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives

    • UNABRIDGED (19 hrs and 52 mins)
    • By Steven Levy
    • Narrated By L. J. Ganser
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (317)
    Performance
    (88)
    Story
    (89)

    Few companies in history have ever been as successful and as admired as Google, the company that has transformed the Internet and become an indispensable part of our lives. How has Google done it? Veteran technology reporter Steven Levy was granted unprecedented access to the company, and in this revelatory book he takes listeners inside Google headquarters - the Googleplex - to explain how Google works.

    Mrs says: "Great listen"
  •  
  • Twitter Marketing That Doesn't Suck: The Punk Rock Marketing Collection, Volume 1 (






UNABRIDGED) by Michael Clarke Narrated by Greg Zarcone

    Twitter Marketing That Doesn't Suck: The Punk Rock Marketing Collection, Volume 1

    • UNABRIDGED (1 hr and 4 mins)
    • By Michael Clarke
    • Narrated By Greg Zarcone
    • Whispersync for Voice-ready
    Overall
    (1)
    Performance
    (1)
    Story
    (1)

    All those tweets and retweets and follows and hashtags can do a lot more than show you what Kim Kardashian is wearing and what felony Lindsay Lohan committed. Twitter marketing can be one of the fastest and easiest ways to spread the message about your brand...and you know...actually sell stuff. But you gotta sorta know what you're doing. And that's what Twitter Marketing That Doesn't Suck is all about.

  • Mathematics: A Very Short Introduction (






UNABRIDGED) by Timothy Gowers Narrated by Craig Jessen

    Mathematics: A Very Short Introduction

    • UNABRIDGED (5 hrs and 20 mins)
    • By Timothy Gowers
    • Narrated By Craig Jessen
    Overall
    (2)
    Performance
    (2)
    Story
    (2)

    The aim of this audiobook is to explain, carefully but not technically, the differences between advanced, research-level mathematics, and the sort of mathematics we learn at school. The most fundamental differences are philosophical, and listeners of this audiobook will emerge with a clearer understanding of paradoxical-sounding concepts such as infinity, curved space, and imaginary numbers. The first few chapters are about general aspects of mathematical thought.

    Vanessa says: "Doesn't work as an audiobook!"
  • James May's 20th Century (






ABRIDGED) by James May, Phil Dolling Narrated by James May

    James May's 20th Century

    • ABRIDGED (4 hrs and 32 mins)
    • By James May, Phil Dolling
    • Narrated By James May
    Overall
    (93)
    Performance
    (7)
    Story
    (7)

    Longlisted for the Audiobook Download of the Year, 2007.
    How much should you pay for a return trip to the moon? How are Winnie the Pooh and the artificial heart related? Did teenagers exist before 1950? If not, who invented them? James May's 20th Century answers all these questions and more.

    Anabella says: "An Enjoyable & Informative Listen"
  • Dogfight: How Apple and Google Went to War and Started a Revolution (






UNABRIDGED) by Fred Vogelstein Narrated by J. P. Demont

    Dogfight: How Apple and Google Went to War and Started a Revolution

    • UNABRIDGED (8 hrs and 13 mins)
    • By Fred Vogelstein
    • Narrated By J. P. Demont
    Overall
    (16)
    Performance
    (16)
    Story
    (15)

    Behind the bitter rivalry between Apple and Google - and how it's reshaping the way we think about technology. The rise of smartphones and tablets has altered the business of making computers. At the center of this change are Apple and Google, two companies whose philosophies, leaders, and commercial acumen have steamrolled the competition. In the age of Android and the iPad, these corporations are locked in a feud that will play out not just in the marketplace but in the courts and on screens around the world.

    Mr. R. J. King says: "Read by an android"
  • What Stays in Vegas: The World of Personal Data - Lifeblood of Big Business - and the End of Privacy as We Know It (






UNABRIDGED) by Adam Tanner Narrated by John McLain

    What Stays in Vegas: The World of Personal Data - Lifeblood of Big Business - and the End of Privacy as We Know It

    • UNABRIDGED (9 hrs and 9 mins)
    • By Adam Tanner
    • Narrated By John McLain
    Overall
    (0)
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    (0)
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    The greatest threat to privacy today is not the NSA, but good-old American companies. Internet giants, leading retailers, and other firms are voraciously gathering data with little oversight from anyone. In Las Vegas, no company knows the value of data better than Caesars Entertainment. Many thousands of enthusiastic clients pour through the ever-open doors of their casinos. The secret to the company's success lies in their one unrivaled asset: they know their clients intimately by tracking the activities of the overwhelming majority of gamblers.

  • Audible Technology Review, September 2014  by Technology Review Narrated by Todd Mundt

    Audible Technology Review, September 2014

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 10 mins)
    • By Technology Review
    • Narrated By Todd Mundt
    Overall
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    In this Special Issue, Technology Review's 35 Innovators Under 35. All 35 of these people are doing exciting work that could shape their fields for decades. But they're solving problems in remarkably different ways. We consider some of them to be primarily Inventors; they're immersed in building new technologies. Others we call Visionaries, because they're showing how technologies could be put to new or better uses. Humanitarians are using technology to expand opportunities or inform public policy. Pioneers are doing fundamental work that will spawn future innovations; such breakthroughs will be taken up by tomorrow's Entrepreneurs, people who are building new tech businesses. Everyone on the list was nominated either by the public or by MIT Technology Review's editors. Some got our attention when they were picked by our international publishing partners as Innovators Under 35 for their regions. After our editors pared the roughly 500 nominees to 80 finalists, outside judges rated the originality and impact, or potential impact, of their work; those scores guided the editors as they crafted the list.

  • Audible Fast Company, September 2014  by Fast Company Narrated by Ken Borgers

    Audible Fast Company, September 2014

    • HIGHLIGHTS (1 hr and 58 mins)
    • By Fast Company
    • Narrated By Ken Borgers
    Overall
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    "Rebooting YouTube": Susan Wojcicki built google into a 5 billion dollar advertising giant. Now she's running YouTube. Her job - do it again. "The Multimillion Dollar Quest to Brew the Perfect Cup of Coffee": Coffee crusaders, backed by caffeine-buzzed venture capitalists, are taking aim at Starbucks with a seven-dollar cup of joe. "How Flashy Hotelier Sam Nazarian Is Shaking Up Las Vegas": A nightclub impresario has teamed up with a series of big names in an effort to rethink the hospitality business. "Back to Square One": An update on a startup that promised to transform the credit and finance industry with a sweeping, digitized vision of the future.

  • Science News, August 30, 2014  by Society for Science & the Public Narrated by Mark Moran

    Science News, August 30, 2014

    • HIGHLIGHTS (52 mins)
    • By Society for Science & the Public
    • Narrated By Mark Moran
    Overall
    (0)
    Performance
    (0)
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    (0)

    Turn to Science News for the latest coverage of biology, astronomy, the physical sciences, behavioral sciences, math and computers, chemistry, and earth science. This 75-year-old publication is known for its sharp writing and up-to-date coverage of the latest scientific research. Since its debut in 1922, Science News has been committed to providing reports on scientific and technical developments that the layman would find interesting and easy to digest.

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    Your Mac Life, August 28, 2014

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    • By Shawn King
    • Narrated By Shawn King
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    Your Mac Life, hosted by Shawn King, is one of the most popular Mac broadcasts in the world. Download and listen to this weekly, Web-based "radio show" about and for Apple and Mac users. Stay on top of the what's new in the world of Macs, listen to interviews with Mac-related newsmakers, and pick up technical tips to help you make the most of your Mac.

  • Science News, August 23, 2014  by Society for Science & the Public Narrated by Mark Moran

    Science News, August 23, 2014

    • HIGHLIGHTS (53 mins)
    • By Society for Science & the Public
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    Turn to Science News for the latest coverage of biology, astronomy, the physical sciences, behavioral sciences, math and computers, chemistry, and earth science. This 75-year-old publication is known for its sharp writing and up-to-date coverage of the latest scientific research. Since its debut in 1922, Science News has been committed to providing reports on scientific and technical developments that the layman would find interesting and easy to digest.

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    Your Mac Life, August 21, 2014

    • ORIGINAL (1 hr and 50 mins)
    • By Shawn King
    • Narrated By Shawn King
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    Your Mac Life, hosted by Shawn King, is one of the most popular Mac broadcasts in the world. Download and listen to this weekly, Web-based "radio show" about and for Apple and Mac users. Stay on top of the what's new in the world of Macs, listen to interviews with Mac-related newsmakers, and pick up technical tips to help you make the most of your Mac.

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    • UNABRIDGED (10 hrs and 28 mins)
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    Just like the meteor that likely precipitated the end of the dinosaurs, social media is having a monumental impact on the world's economy; a change so dramatic that it has created a new business era. Welcome... to the Social Age. What does the Social Age mean for your business? Containing stories, analysis of real-world scenarios, and indispensable guidance, A World Gone Social gives you the tools and information you need to survive - and thrive - in a business climate in which customers hold all the cards...